Summer 2019 Designer Pattern Highlights

Zandra Rhodes 1973 Field of Lilies / Summer gown photographed by Claire Rothstein
Pat and Anna Cleveland, both in Zandra Rhodes’ Summer gown. Photo: Claire Rothstein. Image: Instagram.

Have you seen the new summer patterns?

Cover look V1627 is an archival design by Zandra Rhodes, as worn by the Latvian-American model Ana Kondratjeva.

Zandra Rhodes pattern V1627 as worn by Ana Kondratjeva on the cover of the Vogue Patterns lookbook, Summer 2019
Zandra Rhodes dress pattern V1627 as worn by Ana Kondratjeva on the cover of the Vogue Patterns lookbook, Summer 2019. Image: Issuu.

Rhodes reissued her 1973 Field of Lilies dress — renamed the Summer, in memory of Donna Summer — for Matches Fashion’s recent 30th anniversary. The designer commissioned Claire Rothstein to take the mother-and-daughter portrait at the top of this post, in which Pat Cleveland and her daughter, Anna, both model the dress. The original is printed silk chiffon.

Vogue 1627 by Zandra Rhodes
Vogue 1627 by Zandra Rhodes (2019) Model: Ana Kondratjeva. Image: McCall’s.
Matches Fashion 30th anniversary illustration by Zandra Rhodes, 2017
Matches Fashion 30th anniversary illustration by Zandra Rhodes, 2017. Image: Instagram.

Inspired by Alessandro Michele’s Gucci, the new Very Easy Vogue pyjama is illustrated with ribbon trim, and in a version of the Gucci Flora print.

V9375
Vogue 9375 after Gucci (2019) Image: McCall’s.

For Gucci Pre-Fall 2018, in place of a more conventional lookbook, American artist Peter Schlesinger shot a photobook on location in Rome. Called Disturbia, it was inspired by the films of Dario Argento, the director behind the original Suspiria.

Inside Disturbia – Gucci Pre-Fall 2018 by Alessandro Michele. Photos: Peter Schlesinger. Image: Another Man.

A variation of the Gucci Flora pyjamas in printed silk twill.

Gucci by Alessandro Michele, Pre-Fall 2018. Photo: Peter Schlesinger. Image: Vogue Runway.

Michele paired a full-length version of the trousers, trimmed in the distinctive Gucci ribbon, with a faux-fur coat.

Gucci by Alessandro Michele, Pre-Fall 2018. Photo: Peter Schlesinger. Image: Vogue Runway.

The Pre-Fall 2019 ad campaign features another version of the Gucci Flora pyjama, as seen in the ancient ruins of Selinunte, Sicily. Vogue’s reference kimono top and pant (on pre-order at Neiman Marcus) is silk georgette.

Gucci PreFall 2019
Gucci Pre-Fall 2019, with members of Brooklyn punk band Surfbort. Photo: Glen Luchford. Image: Instagram.

The new Tracy Reese sundress has a cowl neckline, criss-cross back, and midriff that extends into waist ties. (See WWD for recent news.)

V1625 by Tracy Reese
Vogue 1625 by Tracy Reese (2019) Model: Ana Kondratjeva. Image: McCall’s.

Martha Graham was the inspiration for Reese’s Spring 2015 collection, where the dress was shown with a kimono jacket in the same botanical print.

Tracy Reese Spring 2015
Tracy Reese Spring 2015. Photo: Alessandro Garofalo. Image: Vogue Runway.

There are two patterns from Rachel Comey. The first: the Willow peasant top and Basin pant with grosgrain waistband. Judging from the pattern number, it may have been delayed from the Spring release. Hopefully this doesn’t signal the wrapping up of the designer’s contract. (See: Laroche?)

Vogue 1618 by Rachel Comey
Vogue 1618 by Rachel Comey (2019) Willow top, Basin pant. Model: Heather Aboff. Image: McCall’s.

Both pieces made their début in Comey’s country-and-western themed Pre-Fall 2016 collection, shot by New York street photographer Gus Powell. The original Willow top (right) is rayon gauze.

Rachel Comey Pre-Fall 2016
Rachel Comey Pre-Fall 2016. Photo: Gus Powell. Image: Vogue Runway.

For Fall 2016, Comey showed the top in a cute print. Later, it could even be seen in a lace and gingham combo.

Rachel Comey Fall 2016
Rachel Comey Fall 2016. Image: Vogue Runway.

The second Rachel Comey is a pair of unisex shirts. The unisex / menswear angle is welcome, since Comey made her name with men’s shirts. (See my earlier post.)

V1622 Rachel Comey unisex shirt pattern
Vogue 1622 by Rachel Comey (2019) Tre and Selleck unisex shirts. Image: McCall’s.

The Selleck shirt is short-sleeved, with seam interest, while the Tre shirt is a long-sleeved button-down. Both were shown in Comey’s Spring 2017 15th anniversary collection, which saw the launch of her unisex line.

Rachel Comey’s Selleck shirt, 2017. Image: Uncover LA.
Rachel Comey Spring 2017. Image: Vogue Runway.
Detail, Tre shirt by Rachel Comey in printed charmeuse, 2017. Image: Lyst / Farfetch.

After a decade of licensing, Simplicity has released a swimwear design by Cynthia Rowley. The colour-blocked one-piece is called the Heather, and retails in Rowley’s signature neoprene.

Simplicity 8928 by Cynthia Rowley (2019)
Simplicity 8928 by Cynthia Rowley (2019) Image: Simplicity.
Cynthia Rowley’s Heather one-piece in colour-blocked neoprene. Image: Cynthia Rowley.

The new pattern also includes a button-front maxi dress with ruffle sleeves. Add bodice tucks and you have the Nairobi kaftan — Rowley’s opening look for Spring 2017. The original caftan dress is 100% cotton.

Cynthia Rowley Spring 2017. Photo: William Eadon. Image: Vogue Runway.

Finally, a stealth bridal pattern: Very Easy Vogue V9373, a version of a Stella McCartney gown that was the first change of a newly minted duchess. (More at Vogue.)

V9373
Vogue 9373 after Stella McCartney (2019) Image: McCall’s.
Meghan Markle in Stella McCartney bridal, with Prince Harry, Windsor Castle, May 2018
The newly married Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, leave Windsor Castle to attend an evening reception at Frogmore House, May 2018. Photo: Steve Parsons. Image: AFP/Getty via Vogue.

The bride’s silk crepe, open-backed gown was an advance look at the Stella McCartney Made With Love collection, which launched in autumn, 2018.

McCartneyBridal1
Stella McCartney Made With Love bridal collection. Images: Stella McCartney.

Make in cruelty-free, sustainable fabrics for the authentic Stella McCartney touch.

McCartney-bridal2
Stella McCartney Made With Love bridal collection. Images: Stella McCartney.

11 thoughts on “Summer 2019 Designer Pattern Highlights

  1. OHHH! The Zandra Rhodes dress! Not sure my sewing skills are up to silk chiffon but SO gorgeous. The Gucci pyjamas!

    Your post is always a joy.

    Don’t always have time to look at it but always worth it when I do.

    I did sew at one time. On Tobago I learned pattern cutting from a marvellous woman called Theodora Greaves. Former headmistress, former fashion house employee in New York, wise woman, adviser and mentor to many, including high placed politicians. On small islands, everyone knows everyone. At the time there were few ready made clothing imports so there were many dressmakers, and the best were taught by Mrs Greaves.

    Long time ago. When I look at my patterns and what I sewed, I can’t believe I did those things. I’m not a natural and very slow but it made me happy. I always wanted to know how to build a pattern from scratch, see a photo and take it from there. That turned out easier for me than adapting bought patterns to fit.

    But I’ve bought a new sewing machine and will buy an overlocker, so hope to start off simply again. Often I just want a base wardrobe: like in summer the same white or black linen pants with slight tweaks as trends shift. Hate to spend hours and too much money looking around shops.

    Thank you for your all your posts!

    Shonagh

  2. Another really great blog post which has given me lots of ideas. I particularly like the Zandra Rhodes kimono, what a delight, and the lovely Stella McCartney dress. Thank you so much your blogs are so very, very interesting although I do wish they came a little more often!

  3. Thanks so much for your beautiful review. I don’t need any of these clothes, but they are a joy to look at.

  4. Thank you for a great post! I love that you visually “thread” the same pieces in different scenarios. Also love that you name the models — they’re the ones who really “SELL” the design.

  5. I’m delighted to know that the Selleck shirt has a name; it’s the first pattern I’ve seen in a long time that I’d rather buy than draft myself (and the very first that any man I’ve sewn for has seen and asked for). Mostly because I love things with names.

  6. A version of the field of lilies dress was just seen at the Gabriella Windsor royal-adjacent wedding! It was seen in the background of pictures of the newlyweds on the chapel steps.

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