Rachel Comey: Vogue Patterns

October 18, 2016 § 4 Comments

Rachel Comey's Bowtie poplin top and printed pants (Vogue 1507), Spring 2015

Rachel Comey’s Bowtie top and printed trousers, Spring 2015 collection. Image: Instagram.

Last month, Rachel Comey celebrated her label’s 15-year anniversary with an outdoor presentation of unisex looks for Spring 2017. For home sewers, Comey’s ongoing licensing with Vogue Patterns has made her one to watch. Here’s a look at highlights of her patterns so far.

Dan Stevens in Rachel Comey's Pierrot dress, Pre-Fall 2013

Dan Stevens in Rachel Comey’s Pierrot dress. Image: Instagram.

Born in Manchester, Connecticut, Rachel Comey (b. 1973) originally trained as a sculptor. After moving to New York, she consulted for Theory while designing clothes for local performers like Gogol Bordello—a connection that led her and the band to the Whitney Biennial. She launched her menswear collection in September, 2001, followed by women’s wear in 2004. Comey has developed a cult following for her footwear, prints, and general “bullshit-free kookiness.”

Courtney Love photographed by Jean-Baptiste Mondino in a men's lipstick print shirt by Rachel Comey

Courtney Love wears a men’s lipstick print shirt by Rachel Comey, The Face, April 2002. Photo: Jean-Baptiste Mondino. Image: eBay.

Ceramics-inspired Rachel Comey Stoneware print

Rachel Comey’s Stoneware print, inspired by Lena Beug’s ceramics. Image: Instagram.

Comey was introduced to home sewers in the February/March 2010 issue of Vogue Patterns magazine with two patterns, Vogue 1161 and 1170:

Rachel Comey article with V1161, Vogue Patterns, February/March 2010.

“Cutting edge: Rachel Comey,” Vogue Patterns, February/March 2010.

Rachel Comey article with V1170, Vogue Patterns, February/March 2010.

Vogue 1170 by Rachel Comey, Vogue Patterns, February/March 2010.

The originals showcase Comey’s leopard and man-with-umbrella prints, both from the Fall 2009 collection.

Leopard-print dress from Rachel Comey's Fall 2009 collection, as worn by Timoxa Timoschenko

A leopard-print dress from Rachel Comey’s Fall 2009 collection. Model: Timoxa Timoschenko. Image: vogue.com.

Powerhouse Vogue 1247 includes an A-line miniskirt and the Navigator top, a design that was produced over multiple seasons (available in the shop):

Rachel Comey Navigator top and skirt pattern Vogue 1247

Vogue 1247 by Rachel Comey (2011) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

Vogue 1298 is a pattern for Comey’s Tippet dress. (She also designed an open-backed Tippet top.) The Tippet is an apron dress with raised hem and straps drawn together in back:

Tippet apron dress pattern by Rachel Comey, Vogue 1298

Vogue 1298 by Rachel Comey (2012) Tippet dress.

The dress was shown in a different print in the Spring 2011 collection:

Mariana Santana wears Rachel Comey's Tippet dress on the Spring 2011 runway

Rachel Comey’s Tippet dress on the Spring 2011 runway. Model: Mariana Santana. Image: vogue.com.

Also from 2012, Vogue 1323 is a top and pants ensemble consisting of the Syndicate blouse and cuffed Saunter pant. The trousers were also produced in textured velvet and various prints:

Rachel Comey top and pants pattern Vogue 1323

Vogue 1323 by Rachel Comey (2012) Image: Etsy.

Alexandra Tretter in Rachel Comey Saunter pant, Fall 2011

Rachel Comey’s Saunter pant, Black Wood silk-wool print, Fall 2011 collection. Model: Alexandra Tretter. Image: vogue.com.

Bianca Luz in Rachel Comey's Saunter pant, Fall 2011

Rachel Comey’s Saunter pant in semi-sheer, textured velvet, Fall 2011 collection. Model: Bianca Luz. Image: vogue.com.

Vogue 1406, known as the Surveillance dress, has an asymmetrical neckline, back godet, and ruched waist detail:

Rachel Comey Surveillance dress pattern Vogue 1406

Vogue 1406 by Rachel Comey (2014) Image: eBay.

Here’s the original star-print Surveillance dress on the Fall 2013 runway:

Rachel Comey's star-print Surveillance dress, Fall 2013

Rachel Comey’s Surveillance dress, Fall 2013 collection. Image: vogue.com

Comey’s batwing Wades dress is available as Vogue 1482. The diagonal front seam conceals a pocket:

Rachel Comey Wades dress pattern Vogue 1482

Vogue 1482 by Rachel Comey (2016) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

Rachel Comey's Wades dress, Spring 2015

Rachel Comey’s Wades dress, Spring 2015 collection. Image: vogue.com.

From the same collection, Vogue 1507 includes the Bowtie top and slim pants with an asymmetrical front closure:

Rachel Comey top and pants pattern Vogue 1507

Vogue 1507 by Rachel Comey (2015) Image: Etsy.

Rachel Comey's Bowtie top and pants, Spring 2015

Rachel Comey’s Bowtie top and pants, Spring 2015 collection. Image: vogue.com.

Vogue 1501 is a pattern for the Delane dress, a sleeveless, mock two-piece dress with pleating details. The original shows off Comey’s Collage print; the design was also produced with a contrast front bodice and in a single, solid colour:

Rachel Comey's Delane dress pattern Vogue 1501

Vogue 1501 by Rachel Comey (2016) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

Rachel Comey's Delane dress in solid navy

Navy Delane dress by Rachel Comey.

The latest Rachel Comey pattern is a long-sleeved jumpsuit, Vogue 1523 (click to view in the shop):

Rachel Comey jumpsuit pattern Vogue 1523

Vogue 1523 by Rachel Comey (2016) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

The Botanical-print jumpsuit was part of the Fall 2015 collection’s closing look:

Rachel Comey jacket and Botanical print jumpsuit, Fall 2015

Rachel Comey jumpsuit, Fall 2015 collection. Image: vogue.com.

Interestingly, Comey was quoted in the New York Times’ recent article on the McCall Pattern Company (“Needle, Thread, Instagram“):

The New York designer Rachel Comey has licensed her patterns to McCall since 2010, where they appear under the Vogue Patterns brand. She didn’t do it for the money. “I just like the tradition of it,” Ms. Comey said. “Sewing is a great craft. It’s exciting and confidence building. I wanted to support it.”

Now if only we could source those Rachel Comey prints…

Artist and activist Sarah Sophie Flicker at the White House in Rachel Comey's Surveillance dress

Artist and activist Sarah Sophie Flicker wears Rachel Comey’s Surveillance dress at the White House, 2015. Image: Instagram.

Patterns in Vogue: How to Make the Most of a Beautiful Print

September 18, 2016 § 2 Comments

Ann Schaufuss photographed by Clive Arrowsmith for British Vogue, autumn 1970

Detail, British Vogue, October 1, 1970. Photo: Clive Arrowsmith. Model: Ann Schaufuss. Image: Youthquakers.

How to make the most of a beautiful print? As an early ’70s British Vogue editorial puts it, “Cape it… blouse it… kilt it.”

The Clive Arrowsmith editorial features Ann Schaufuss in three Vogue patterns that present the silhouettes of fall 1970 in glowing, ink-coloured prints. From Nina Ricci, Vogue 2406 is an “enveloping berber cape” and sleeveless dress made from two Staron fabrics in the same “glass-flower” print: a luxurious wool-viscose-polyamide for the cape and panne velvet for the dress, available at Harrods and Gasmey, London.

Ann Schaufuss in Vogue Paris Original 2406 by Nina Ricci, photographed by Clive Arrowsmith, 1970

Vogue 2406 by Nina Ricci, British Vogue, October 1, 1970. Photo: Clive Arrowsmith. Model: Ann Schaufuss. Image: Youthquakers.

The second look pairs a yoked, full-sleeved blouse, Vogue 7538, and long Miss Vogue kilt Vogue 7889. The blouse is turquoise silk crepe de chine from Gasmey, while the kilt is Bombyx rayon panne velvet in a green and jewel-toned print, available at Liberty (boots to order at The Chelsea Cobbler):

Ann Schaufuss wears blouse Vogue 7538 and skirt Miss Vogue 7889, photographed for Vogue UK by Clive Arrowsmith

Vogue 7538 and 7889 in British Vogue, October 1, 1970. Photo: Clive Arrowsmith. Model: Ann Schaufuss. Image: Youthquakers.

The boho Baba Yaga look may not be to everyone’s taste, but velvet and early ’70s style are trends for fall 2016… Time to dig out some vintage prints?

(See Youthquakers for more of the October issue.)

Jean Muir: Vogue Patterns

September 13, 2016 § 7 Comments

Jean Muir dress photographed by David Bailey for the cover of British Vogue, 1973

A Jean Muir look on the cover of British Vogue, February 1973. Photo: David Bailey. Model: Susan Moncur. Image: eBay.

Jean Muir was the only designer to ascend from Butterick Young Designer to Vogue Couturier. (See my post on Jean Muir’s Butterick patterns here.) This week, a look at Vogue’s Jean Muir patterns from the early 1970s to the mid-1980s.

muirsketches

Jean Muir sketches on display in the National Museum of Scotland’s new galleries. Image © National Museums Scotland

muirpieces

Pattern pieces for a Jean Muir dress, Spring 1980. Image © National Museums Scotland.

1970s

Jean Muir was introduced as a new Vogue Couturier in Vogue Pattern Book’s first issue of 1972. Three Muir designs (Vogue 2663, 2664, and 2646) were pictured throughout the magazine, but only the last two appear in the designer feature: Vogue 2664’s full-sleeved dress in saffron jersey, and Vogue 2646’s evening dress and matching short shorts in bone-coloured matte jersey. The model on the right is Joyce Walker (click to enlarge):

Introducing Jean Muir: 1970s dress patterns Vogue 2664 and 2646

“Introducing Jean Muir” — Vogue 2664 and 2646 in Vogue Pattern Book, February/March 1972.

Posing for Richard Avedon, Faye Dunaway wears a Jean Muir dress with handkerchief sleeves:

Faye Dunaway photographed by Richard Avedon in Jean Muir, 1973

Faye Dunaway in Jean Muir, Vogue, March 1973. Photo: Richard Avedon. Image: The Fashion Spot.

This dress with gathered centre panels and shirttail hem was featured on the counter catalogue in a lush floral print:

1970s Jean Muir dress pattern Vogue 2804

Vogue 2804 by Jean Muir (1973) Image: Etsy.

Jean Muir's grand terrace gesture, 2804 on the cover of Vogue Patterns catalogue, May 1973

Vogue 2804 by Jean Muir, Vogue Patterns catalogue, May 1973. Image: eBay.

Vogue 2884 is an evening dress with raised waist and pintuck details. The back is particularly elegant (available in the shop):

1970s Jean Muir evening dress pattern Vogue 2884

Vogue 2884 by Jean Muir (1973) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

David Bailey photographed Anjelica Huston in an olive version—with matching cloche—for British Vogue:

Anjelica Huston photographed by David Bailey in Jean Muir, 1973

Jean Muir olive suede-trimmed angora dress and cloche, British Vogue, September 1, 1973. Photo: David Bailey. Model: Anjelica Huston. Image: Youthquakers.

Muir ensembles often involve matching hats, and her patterns sometimes include a head covering. This pattern has three (click to view in the PatternVault shop):

1970s Jean Muir hat and scarf pattern Vogue 1148

Vogue 1148 by Jean Muir (1974) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

A news cover illustrated by Michaele Vollbracht recommends wearing View C’s ‘ScarfCap’ with a ‘BigDress’ for fall ’75:

1970s Jean Muir scarf cap pattern Vogue 1148 (with dress 9239), illustrated by Michaele Vollbracht

Vogue 9239 with Vogue 1148 by Jean Muir, Vogue Patterns Eye on Fashion, September 1975. Illustration: Michaele Vollbracht. Image: eBay.

Vogue 1153 has characteristic Jean Muir dressmaker details—radiating Deco pintucks, tucked sleeves, released pleats, and contrast topstitching. The recommended fabrics include lightweight synthetic knits, matte jersey, tricot knits, and wool jersey:

1970s Jean Muir dress pattern Vogue 1153

Vogue 1153 by Jean Muir (1974) Image: Etsy.

On assignment for Vogue, Deborah Turbeville photographed Muir with models in her all-white apartment:

Deborah Turbeville photo of models with Jean Muir in Vogue, February 1975

Models with Jean Muir in Vogue, February 1975. Photo: Deborah Turbeville. Models: Paddy Grey and Clio Goldsmith. Image: What Goes Around Comes Around.

Deborah Turbeville photo of Jean Muir with models in her suede dresses in Vogue, February 1975

Jean Muir with models in her suede dresses: Louise Pleydell-Bouverie, Clio Goldsmith, and Paddy Grey, for Vogue, February 1975. Photo: Deborah Turbeville. Image: the Wapping Project.

Turbeville’s legendary Bathhouse series includes a Jean Muir Liberty-print smock:

Jean Muir smock dress photographed by Deborah Turbeville at the Asser Levy Bathhouse, New York

Right: Jean Muir Liberty print smock dress, Vogue, May 1975. Photo: Deborah Turbeville. Stylist: Polly Mellen. Image: the Fashion Spot.

1980s

Vogue 2399’s full-sleeved dress was previously seen in my Iman post:

1980s Jean Muir dress pattern feat. Iman, Vogue 2399

Vogue 2399 by Jean Muir (1980) Model: Iman.

Vogue 2463 reinterprets Muir’s trademark cut-in sleeves and pin-tucked bodice for the early ’80s:

1980 Jean Muir dress pattern Vogue 2463

Vogue 2463 by Jean Muir (1980) Image: Etsy.

Vogue 1123’s two-piece dress arranges pleated volumes around smooth central panels:

1980s Jean Muir top and skirt pattern Vogue 1123

Vogue 1123 by Jean Muir (1983) Image: Rusty Zipper.

The latest Jean Muir Vogue pattern I’ve seen is Vogue 1502, a jacket and skirt. The unlined jacket has deep kimono sleeves and a broad waistline tuck:

1980s Jean Muir skirt and jacket pattern Vogue 1502

Vogue 1502 by Jean Muir (1985) Image: Etsy.

Postscript

Style Patterns—by then owned by Simplicity—produced this dress pattern to accompany Channel Four’s 1993 television series, Very Jean Muir. The pattern is found in the National Museum of Scotland’s Jean Muir Collection:

1990s Jean Muir dress pattern for the Channel Four series "Very Jean Muir"

Channel Four / Style 0526 by Jean Muir (1993) Image: eBay.

Jean Muir’s dedication to the craft of fashion design gives her work a special appeal for home sewers. When Leeds Art Galleries mounted a travelling Jean Muir exhibition, dressmakers brought their Vogue patterns for her to sign.* Have you made any Jean Muir patterns?

* Maureen Cleave, “Makers of Modern Fashion: Jean Muir,” Observer supplement, September 21, 1980.
Grace Coddington photographed by Eric Boman in Jean Muir, British Vogue, fall 1973

Jean Muir dress, British Vogue, September 15, 1973. Photo: Eric Boman. Model: Grace Coddington. Image: Beauty is a warm gun.

Karen Kain photographed by David Montgomery in Jean Muir (Graham Smith cap), 1975

Karen Kain in Jean Muir, Vogue, November 1975. Photo: David Montgomery. Image: Barefoot Vintage.

Donna Mitchell photographed by David Bailey in a suede and jersey ensemble by Jean Muir, 1973

Punched suede top and matte jersey skirt by Jean Muir, British Vogue, February 1973. Photo: David Bailey. Model: Donna Mitchell. Image: Youthquakers.

Patterns in Vogue: Cotton Landscape

August 16, 2016 § 1 Comment

Pattie Boyd photographed by Brian Duffy in sunglasses and hooded jumpsuit for Vogue UK, 1965

Detail, British Vogue, June 1965. Photo: Brian Duffy. Model: Pattie Boyd. Image: Youthquakers.

In 1965, Brian Duffy photographed Pattie Boyd for a patterns editorial, “Cotton Landscape,” in British Vogue. The editorial opens with Boyd posing in Oliver Goldsmith sunglasses and an Op Art playsuit:

"Cotton Landscape: Pretty Dazzling" - Pattie Boyd photographed by Brian Duffy, 1965

“Cotton Landscape: Pretty Dazzling” – Vogue 6491 in British Vogue, June 1965. Photos: Brian Duffy. Model: Pattie Boyd. Image: Youthquakers.

Boyd’s playsuit was made using Vogue 6491, a Young Fashionables pattern for a hooded ‘jump suit,’ bikini, skirt, and pants. As the caption says, “Powerhouse zigzags, electric pattern on a beach playsuit made to dazzle, not shock. Shorts shaped with a long front zip, smashing hood, and long cuffed sleeves.” The suit was made in Cepea navy and white cotton “with a Calpreta permanent sheen finish,” available from Bourne & Hollingsworth and Civil Service Stores.

For more of the June issue, see Youthquakers.

Hooded jumpsuit Vogue 6491 worn by Pattie Boyd in British Vogue, June 1965. Photo: Brian Duffy.

Pattie Boyd wears hooded jumpsuit Vogue 6491, British Vogue, June 1965. Photo: Brian Duffy. Image: Youthquakers.

Designer Swimwear: Vintage Patterns

August 9, 2016 § 6 Comments

1980s Bob Mackie swimsuit pattern McCall's 7138 photographed for McCall's summer news flier

McCall’s 7138 by Bob Mackie on the cover of McCall’s news, July 1980.

It’s been another hot summer here in Toronto. One of my earliest blog posts, Heat Wave!, surveys vintage beachwear patterns. This summer, let’s take a look at a more elusive beast: designer swimwear patterns.

1950s

The earliest pattern I’ve seen for designer swimwear is Pucci’s strapless one-piece, McCall’s 3977. This pattern was available in Junior sizes only. The suit was lined in jersey, and could be made with or without the brightly coloured appliqués:

1950s Emilio Pucci bathing suit pattern McCall's 3977

McCall’s 3977 by Emilio Pucci (1956) Image: eBay.

1960s

From another Italian designer, Irene Galitzine, Vogue 1288 is a pattern for a bikini, dress, and hat. The bikini consists of a cropped, cowl-neck blouse and bikini pants with side ties:

1960s Galitzine bikini, coverup, and hat pattern Vogue 1288

Vogue 1288 by Irene Galitzine (ca. 1963) Image: eBay.

1970s

The 1970s were the heyday of designer swimwear patterns, often with a coordinating coverup, and always for stretch knits. Vogue 1416 is an early design by Donna Karan; from Anne Klein’s collaboration with Penfold, the pattern includes both a maillot and a halter bikini:

Vogue 1416

Vogue 1416 by Donna Karan at Anne Klein for Penfold (1976) Image: Etsy.

From Bill Blass, Vogue 1455 includes a two-piece swimsuit with bra top and bikini briefs:

1970s Bill Blass jacket, pants, and swimsuit pattern Vogue 1455

Vogue 1455 by Bill Blass (1976)

John Kloss licensed a number of swimwear designs with Butterick. This ad promotes his patterns with a poolside photo of Butterick 4808:

Butterick Kloss ad 1976

Butterick 4808 by John Kloss, Butterick advertisement, 1976. Image: eBay.

Another Butterick designer, Gil Aimbez, designed this one-piece bathing suit. Contrast bias binding outlines the cut-away sides and bodice seaming detail:

1970s Gil Aimbez swimsuit and coverup pattern Butterick 5449

Butterick 5449 by Gil Aimbez (ca. 1977) Image: Etsy.

Like the Anne Klein Penfold pattern above, this Penfold pattern includes both one-piece and halter bikini bathing suits. The one-piece and bikini top are cut on the bias:

1970s Penfold pattern Vogue 1655

Vogue 1655 by Penfold (ca. 1977) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Both Penfold patterns can be seen in a Vogue Patterns editorial photographed in Antigua:

1970s Anne Klein / Penfold halter bikini pattern by Donna Karan, Vogue 1416 in Vogue Patterns magazine

Beach beauty: halter bikini Vogue 1416 by Donna Karan at Anne Klein for Penfold, Vogue Patterns, May/June 1977. Model: Clotilde. Photo: Albert Watson. Image: the Fashion Spot.

Vogue Patterns MayJun 1977 Penfold

Vogue 1655 by Penfold with Vogue 9808, Vogue Patterns, May/June 1977. Models: Lisa Cooper and Clotilde. Photos: Albert Watson. Image: the Fashion Spot.

From spring, 1978, Vogue 1893 seems to have been the only Catalina pattern. Instead of a coverup, it includes three styles of bathing suit: low-backed view A, strapless view B with built-in boning, and blouson view C is a two-piece:

1970s Catalina swimsuit pattern Vogue 1893

Vogue 1893 by Catalina (1978) Image: Etsy.

The magazine recommended making the Catalina suits in Thompson of California’s “second skin Tic Toc warp knit polyester crepes” in various prints:

Vogue 1893 by Catalina, Vogue Patterns, May/June 1978. Image: Vintage Goodness.

1980s

From 1980, McCall’s 7109 includes three one-piece swimsuits by the Italian label Basile: a mock wrap, belted halter-neck and variations on the strapless suit with gathered bust (available in the shop):

1980s Basile swimsuit pattern - McCall's 7109

McCall’s 7109 by Basile (1980) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

Jerry Hall (right) seems to be wearing the view A style in this Basile ad photographed by Irving Penn:

vogue italia 1980 penn basile

Basile advertisement in Vogue Italia, 1980. Photo: Irving Penn. Models: Michelle Stevens and Jerry Hall. Image: the Fashion Spot.

Also from 1980, Bob Mackie’s strapless, colour-blocked swimsuit, McCall’s 7138, was photographed for the July counter catalogue and news leaflet (seen at the top of this post):

1980s Bob Mackie swimsuit and cover-up pattern McCall's 7138

McCall’s 7138 by Bob Mackie (1980) Image: Etsy.

1990s

Finally, this early ’90s DKNY pattern, Vogue 2897, is labelled ‘dress and bodysuit,’ but was photographed as beachwear:

1990s DKNY bodysuit and hooded dress / coverup pattern Vogue 2897

Vogue 2897 by DKNY (1992) Image: Etsy.

After a long swimwear pattern drought, the big pattern companies seem to have noticed the renewed popularity of sewing your own, custom bathing suit. For this summer, Simplicity reissued a 1950s bathing suit pattern, Simplicity 4307 / S8139, and The McCall Pattern Company has released a number of new swimwear designs, including one Vogue and two Lisette swimwear patterns.

Two designers with existing pattern licensing, Cynthia Rowley and Rachel Comey, both have swimwear lines. If we voice our support, perhaps we could soon see patterns for Cynthia Rowley surf wear and Rachel Comey Swim

Cynthia Rowley for Roxy wetsuit, 2010

Wetsuit by Cynthia Rowley for Roxy, 2010. Image: Pinterest.

Willy Somma self-portrait for Rachel Comey Swim, 2013

Willy Somma self-portrait for Rachel Comey Swim, T Magazine, May 2013. Image: nytimes.com.

Oscar de la Renta: Vogue Patterns, Part 2

July 28, 2016 § 3 Comments

Sarah Mower's Oscar de la Renta, with cover from “Couture’s Glorious Excess” (Vogue, October 1997) showing Balmain Fall 1997 haute couture

Sarah Mower, Oscar de la Renta (Assouline, 2nd ed. 2014) Photo: Peter Lindbergh. Editor: Grace Coddington. Image: my luscious life.

Oscar de la Renta was born in July 1932; he would have turned 84 last week. In honour of his birthday, I’ll be looking at Oscar de la Renta sewing patterns from the 1990s and 2000s. (See Part 1 here.)

1990s

Vogue 2460 on the cover of Vogue Patterns March/April 1990

Vogue 2460 by Oscar de la Renta on the cover of Vogue Patterns, March/April 1990. (Patricia Underwood hat.) Photo: Otto Stupakoff. Image: eBay.

The 1990s marked Oscar de la Renta’s fourth decade with Vogue Patterns. From 1990, Vogue 2500 is a dress with pleated overlay and asymmetrical bias collar, chic in a polka dot print. De la Renta was pictured with a model wearing this design in Vogue Patterns magazine (May/June issue); the photo also made the cover of the counter catalogue:

1990s Oscar de la Renta dress pattern, Vogue 2500

Vogue 2500 by Oscar de la Renta (1990) Image: Etsy.

Oscar de la Renta with model in V2500 on the cover of the Vogue Patterns catalogue, June 1990

Oscar de la Renta on the cover of the Vogue Patterns catalogue, June 1990. Image: Karsten Moran for the New York Times.

In 1992, de la Renta became the first American to take over a French couture house when he was appointed chief designer at Balmain. He had begun presenting his own collection in Paris the previous year. (See Suzy Menkes, “De la Renta Joins Balmain.”) The cover of the Assouline book pictured above shows Balmain haute couture; a similar tableau was created for the de Young retrospective.

Vogue 1638 is a brightly coloured skirt suit from Oscar de la Renta’s Spring 1995 collection (full video on YouTube here). Its tailored details, like the jacket’s back pleats and martingale belt, won it an Advanced skill rating. The design was featured in a Vogue Patterns suits article (see The Overflowing Stash) and on the cover of the counter catalogue:

1990s Oscar de la Renta suit pattern Vogue 1638

Vogue 1638 Oscar de la Renta (1995) Image: eBay.

Suited up! Oscar de la Renta suit pattern on the cover of a Vogue Patterns catalogue, October 1995

Vogue Patterns catalogue, October 1995. Image via Etsy.

This double-breasted skirt suit, shown on the runway in pink satin, must be from the Fall 1995 collection. The recommended fabrics are satin, damask, and gabardine:

1990s Oscar de la Renta satin skirt suit pattern - Vogue 1863

Vogue 1863 by Oscar de la Renta (1996)

Ellen von Unwerth photographed Stella Tennant in a corseted lace Oscar de la Renta dress with flamenco dancer Joaquín Cortés for Vogue’s 1996 September issue:

Stella Tennant in Oscar de la Renta, from "This Side of Paradise," photographed in Arles by Ellen von Unwerth with Grace Coddington

Stella Tennant in Oscar de la Renta, with Joaquín Cortés, Vogue, September 1996. Photo: Ellen von Unwerth. Editor: Grace Coddington.

Two years later, Hillary Clinton wore Oscar de la Renta for her Vogue cover (more here):

Hillary Clinton in custom Oscar de la Renta on the cover of Vogue magazine, December 1998

Hillary Clinton in custom Oscar de la Renta, Vogue, December 1998. Photo: Annie Leibovitz. Editor: Paul Cavaco. Image: eBay.

Vogue 2361 is a formal dress from the Spring 1998 collection. The skirt is cut on the bias, the bodice and hemline flounces are finished with self fabric binding, and view A has an asymmetrical train. Kirsten Owen modelled the original on the runway:

1990s Oscar de la Renta dress pattern Vogue 2361

Vogue 2361 by Oscar de la Renta (1999)

Kirsten Owen wears Oscar de la Renta on the Spring 1998 runway

Oscar de la Renta Spring/Summer 1998. Model: Kirsten Owen. Image: firstVIEW.

Just for fun, here’s another editorial photo showing de la Renta’s couture work at Balmain. Ruven Afanador photographed this lace-embroidered gown with matching chihuahua:

Robe en faille de soie brodée de dentelle et pierres de jaïs, sur jupon en tulle de soie. Malgosia Bela in Pierre Balmain couture by Oscar de la Renta

Pierre Balmain haute couture by Oscar de la Renta, Vogue Paris, September 1999. Photo: Ruven Afanador. Image via The Fashion Spot.

2000s

This floral print evening dress is a design from de la Renta’s Spring 2000 collection. Piping defines the waist, and the bias train is trimmed with waist pleats and flounces. The original was modelled on the runway by Carmen Kass:

2000s Oscar de la Renta gown pattern Vogue 2541

Vogue 2541 by Oscar de la Renta (2001)

Oscar de la Renta SS2000 look51Carmen Kass.

Oscar de la Renta Spring/Summer 2000. Model: Carmen Kass. Image: vogue.com.

The Fall 2001 collection included two “decidedly gothic black opera coats,” and Vogue Patterns chose one of them for its customers. Vogue 2714 is a full-sleeved, floor-length opera coat trimmed with frog closures and pleated ruffles. The pattern is sometimes numbered “P935 – Best Seller”:

2000s Oscar de la Renta opera coat or coat dress pattern Vogue 2714 / P935

Vogue 2714 / P935 by Oscar de la Renta (2002) Image: Etsy.

Natalia Semanova wears an Oscar de la Renta opera coat on the Fall 2001 runway

Oscar de la Renta Fall/Winter 2001. Model: Natalia Semanova. Image via vogue.com.

From the Spring 2005 collection, strapless gown pattern Vogue 2889 evokes flamenco with its tiered skirt and draped, drop-waist bodice. The design was shown on the runway with length and bodice variations:

2000s Oscar de la Renta dress pattern Vogue 2889

Vogue 2889 by Oscar de la Renta (2006)

Caroline Ribeiro and Caroline Winberg in Oscar de la Renta SS 2005

Oscar de la Renta Spring/Summer 2005. Models: Caroline Ribeiro and Caroline Winberg. Image: vogue.com.

Vogue 2928 is a grand, off-the-shoulder ballgown complete with boned foundation, attached petticoat, and self fabric flowers and appliqués. The gown was the penultimate look in de la Renta’s Fall 2005 collection:

2000s Oscar de la Renta evening gown pattern Vogue 2928

Vogue 2928 by Oscar de la Renta (2006) Image: ecrater.

Nataliya Gotsii wears a gown from Oscar de la Renta's Fall 2005 collection

Oscar de la Renta Fall/Winter 2005. Model: Nataliya Gotsii. Image: vogue.com.

For more on the late designer, see Vogue’s retrospective. Have you made any Oscar de la Renta patterns?

Kirsten Dunst wears Oscar de la Renta custom-designed for Vogue's Marie Antoinette editorial, 2006

Kirsten Dunst in custom Oscar de la Renta, Vogue, September 2006. Photo: Annie Leibovitz. Editor: Grace Coddington. Image: vogue.com.

Goodbye Donna Karan, Hello Urban Zen?

July 6, 2016 § 8 Comments

Ingrid Sischy, Donna Karan New York (Assouline 2005) Image via Pinterest.

Have you heard? Vogue’s Donna Karan and DKNY patterns will no longer be available after next Wednesday, July 13th. According to the McCall Pattern Company, the licensor of the Donna Karan trademarks [the LVMH-owned Gabrielle Studio Inc.] has decided to end all pattern licensing. (Source: Facebook.)

DonnaKaran_summer2016

Image: voguepatterns.com.

Vogue Patterns has been publishing Donna Karan patterns since 1987. The company added DKNY patterns in 1989.

Vogue Patterns magazine, Autumn 1987

Donna Karan patterns on the cover of Vogue Patterns magazine, Autumn 1987. Image via eBay.

DKNY patterns 2373, 2371, 2375, 2372, 2376 - Vogue Patterns catalogue, November 1989

DKNY patterns on the Vogue Patterns catalogue cover, November 1989. Image via eBay.

The end of both licenses makes the Spring 2016 releases the last DKNY and Donna Karan patterns.

A dress in DKNY Pre-Fall 2013 - Vogue American Designer 1488

Vogue 1488 by DKNY is based on a dress from the Pre-Fall 2013 collection. Image: vogue.com.

A dress from Donna Karan Spring 2014, the original for Vogue American Designer 1489 (2016)

The original for Vogue 1489 in Donna Karan’s Spring 2014 collection. Model: Kati Nescher. Image: vogue.com.

Donna Karan announced her departure from Donna Karan International just over a year ago, saying she means to focus on her new, privately owned company, Urban Zen. Parent company LVMH will not be hiring a replacement. Instead, LVMH will be developing DKNY, which is designed by Public School’s Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne. (See Vanessa Friedman and Jacob Bernstein, “Karan Leaving Brand That Carries Her Name.”)

After thirty years of Vogue patterns—closer to forty, if we count her work at Anne Klein—Karan’s absence will be keenly felt. But could she return soon with Urban Zen patterns? Under her agreement with LVMH, Urban Zen’s “distribution … [can]not compete with any of the Donna Karan brands.” (See Donna Fenn’s interview for Fortune.) This could account for the unprecedented end-date for the Donna Karan and DKNY patterns, just in time for the Fall 2016 pattern launch. Update (July 7): the Fall 2016 patterns were released today, too early to avoid a distribution conflict. Perhaps for Winter 2016?

It would certainly be in keeping with Karan’s ethos if July 14th marked not just an end to the old pattern licensing, but also a new beginning. As her program notes always read, To be continued

Urban Zen, Modern Souls collection

Urban Zen, Modern Souls collection. Image: Urban Zen.

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