How Do You Spell Pride?

1970s iron-on rainbow transfer alphabet McCall's 5567
McCall’s 5567 (1977) Set of full colour iron-on transfers.

This Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the first Pride march, in New York City, on the one-year anniversary of Stonewall.

Despite being headquartered in New York, the big pattern companies have an uneven record of celebrating Pride — at least visibly, on social media. In past years, I’ve tweeted about this silence.

A search for McCall’s + Pride yields this single tweet from 2018.

It’s not too late for the Big 4, and their new parent company IG Design Group, to show support for LGBTQ+ communities. And virtual Pride in London has only just begun.

Happy Pride!

Vogue Paris 100

Vogue Paris, vol. 1 no. 1, 15 juin 1920 - Gallica.bnf.fr / Bibliothèque nationale de France
Inaugural issue of Vogue Paris, June 15, 1920. Illustration: Helen Dryden. Image: Gallica / BnF.

Today is the 100th anniversary of Vogue Paris. To celebrate, here’s a decade-by-decade look at Paris and patterns from the 1920s to now. (Click the images for more.)

In the 1920s, designs by Chanel and other Paris couturiers were available from the McCall Pattern Company. (See my article in the new issue of Selvedge.)

1920s Chanel pattern McCall 4464 - Ladies' and Misses' Evening Dress, "Original Creation by Chanel, Paris"
McCall 4464 by Chanel (1926) Evening dress.

In the 1930s, the Authentic Paris Pattern company sold French designs exclusively, like this ensemble by Schiaparelli.

Authentic Paris Pattern 1647 - schiaparelli, 4 rue de la paix, paris
Paris Pattern 1647 by Schiaparelli (ca. 1931)

Vogue joined the party with its Paris Originals in 1949.

Vogue 1078 by Marie-Blanche de Polignac for Lanvin (1949) Image: eBay.

In the 1950s, the company released its first Dior patterns, by the young Yves Saint Laurent.

1950s Yves Saint Laurent for Dior dress and jacket pattern Vogue 1470
Vogue 1470 by Yves Saint Laurent for Dior (1959) Model: Isabella Albonico. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi.

The couture of André Courrèges caused a sensation in the 1960s. Courrèges didn’t license patterns, but that didn’t stop the American pattern companies from producing a wealth of knockoffs.

McCall's 7923 after Courrèges in McCall's Pattern Fashions, Fall-Winter 1965-66.
McCall’s 7923 after Courrèges (with Marcel Barbeau painting) in a Crompton Corduroy ad, 1965.

In the early 1970s, Yves Saint Laurent shook up the Paris couture with his ’40s-inspired Libération collection.

Vogue 2598
Vogue 2598 by Yves Saint Laurent (1971) Image courtesy of Paco Peralta.

In the late 1980s, when Christian Lacroix left Patou for the prêt-à-porter, his Vogue patterns were conspicuously photographed in Paris.

Vogue 2176 by Christian Lacroix (1988)

John Galliano’s mid-1990s tenure at Givenchy signalled a massive shift for the Paris couture. This ready-to-wear design was available from Vogue Patterns.

John Galliano for Givenchy advertising campaign, Summer 1997. Image: styleregistry.

Guy Laroche was the last, and longest running, label with Vogue Paris Originals. This suit from the aughts was designed by the late Hervé L. Leroux, formerly Hervé Léger.

Guy Laroche Vogue Paris Original V2937 by Hervé L. Leroux ©2006 - Backless jacket and pants pattern
Vogue 2937 by Hervé L. Leroux (Hervé Léger) for Guy Laroche (2006)

Today, Vogue Paris Originals are no more, and you’re more likely to see versions of styles shown on the Paris runway, like this coat adapted from Sarah Burton for McQueen.

Tatyana Cooper in Vogue 1649 coat pattern after Alexander McQueen by Sarah Burton (Fall 2018)
Vogue 1649 after Alexander McQueen by Sarah Burton (2019) Model: Tatyana Cooper. Image: McCall’s.