Free Designer Pattern: Mary Quant Georgie Dress

Georgie dress by Mary Quant (ca. 1962) Image: V&A.

As part of its recent Mary Quant exhibit, the V&A shared a pattern for an early Quant design. The Georgie dress dates to the Bazaar days, before Quant’s deal with Butterick.

Photo: Richard Davis. Image: Harper’s Bazaar.
King's Road plaque: Dame Mary Quant, Fashion Designer, opened her boutique Bazaar on this site in 1955
King’s Road Bazaar plaque. Image: Fashion Network.

The V&A’s Georgie dress— purchased new in Truro, Cornwall — is striped cotton lined with cotton batiste.

'Georgie' dress, Mary Quant, 1962, England. Museum no. T.74-2018. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Given by Sarah E. Robinson
Georgie dress by Mary Quant, ca. 1962. Gift of Sarah E. Robinson. Image: V&A.

As Quant’s archive shows, the dress was also available in taffeta-lined chiffon as the Rosie, in black, pink, or jade.

1960s design for 'Georgie' and 'Rosie' dress by Mary Quant
Design for ‘Georgie’ and ‘Rosie’ dress by Mary Quant (ca. 1961-65) Image: V&A.

The Georgie pattern was developed from Quant’s original by London’s Alice & Co Patterns, a mother and daughter team with a connection to the museum: the younger generation, Lilia Prier Tisdall, works there as a costume display specialist.

Mary Quant’s Georgie dress in Ray Stitch fabric. Sewing pattern designed by Alice and Co Patterns. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

The dress has a surplice bodice, three-quarter sleeves, pleated skirt, and sash belt. For the original’s lively, reverse stripe effect, cut the skirt on a different grain than the sleeves and bodice.

Technical drawing for Mary Quant’s Georgie dress. Image: V&A.

The pattern gives detailed instructions, including for the pleated trim.

Making the Georgie dress. Image: V&A.

Download the Georgie dress pattern. (Instructions here.) The pattern has 7 pieces, arranged in 3 formats: A0, A4, and US Letter. Test square included to check scale.

Size: Two size ranges, UK 6–16 and 18–22

Yardage: 4m (4.5 yds) of 45″ fabric, 1m (1 1/8 yds) lining

Recommended fabrics: Soft cotton, cotton blends, or glazed cotton.

Seam allowance: 1cm (3/8″)

Notions: 56 cm (22″) flat zipper, interfacing for belt.

Notes: Skirt, frill, and belt pieces are to be drafted.

Click here for more instalments in my Free Designer Patterns series.

Georgie dress by Mary Quant, ca. 1962. Gift of Sarah E. Robinson. Image: V&A.

Patterns in Vogue: Pillow Talk

Dorothea McGowan in breakfast coat Vogue 9774, 1960 - "fresh, frothy, delicious - almost Victorian in feeling, even to the pale ribbon sash."
“Fresh, frothy, delicious” – breakfast coat worn by Dorothea McGowan in Vogue, May 1, 1960. Photo: Leombruno-Bodi.

This Galentine’s, a midcentury slumber party.

Leombruno-Bodi photographed three models, including Nena von Schlebrügge and Dorothea McGowan, in airy loungewear made from Vogue patterns.

Vogue 5032 and 9774 in Vogue, May 1, 1960. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi.

Left: Red polka dots printed on white cotton: brief panties, a top swung briskly from red ribbon shoulder straps. In Crown Soap n’ Water fabric. Centre: Candy-striped silk, slipping into a perfect fall from narrow, softly bowed ribbon straps. Pink and orange stripes skimming white silk; the ribbon, orange. A.P.Silk fabric. Right: White cotton batiste, embroidered with white medallions; single touch of colour, the trailing, sweet-blue ribbon. Emanuel Roth fabric. All ribbon by Century.

The patterns are Vogue 9774 and 5032, a ruffled breakfast coat and nightgown / short pyjamas and nightcap.

Late 1950s-early 1960s lingerie patterns Vogue 9774 and Vogue 5032 "Very Easy to Make"

Pattern images: Vintage Pattern Wiki, Pinterest.

Patterns in Vogue: Hutton Meets Warhol

Model reclines on a large Andy Warhol silver helium-filled pillow wearing a Vogue Pattern 6928 dress
Lauren Hutton with Warhol pillows. Photo: Gianni Penati. Image: flickr.

A Vreeland-era Vogue Patterns editorial shows Lauren Hutton with silver, helium-filled pillows by Andy Warhol, who would have been 90 this year.

Andy Warhol photographed by Stephen Shore at Silver Clouds, Leo Castelli Gallery, 1966
Andy Warhol at the Leo Castelli Gallery, 1966. Photo: Stephen Shore. Image: Phaidon.

The Mylar pillows were the stars of Warhol’s Silver Clouds show at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York. (More here.) The patterns are Vogue 6733 and Vogue 6928, both “Easy to Make.” Shown in silver cloqué, the short dress was adapted as a dancing dress; the long dress was designed as a nightgown. (Regina Novelty earrings; Bernardo sandals. Hair by Marc Sinclaire.)

Happy New Year, everyone! All the best for 2019.

Lauren Hutton in Vogue, July 1966 Photo: Gianni Penati.
Lauren Hutton in Vogue, July 1966. Photo: Gianni Penati. Image: Youthquakers.
Lauren Hutton in Vogue, July 1966. Photo: Gianni Penati. Image: Youthquakers.

Vogue 6733 and Vogue 6928: 2 patterns worn by Lauren Hutton in Vogue, July 1966

Pattern images: Mrs. Wooster, Vintage Pattern Wiki.

Mary Quant: Butterick Patterns

Tania Mallet wears Mary Quant and James Wedge on the cover of British Vogue, October 1, 1963
Tania Mallet wears Mary Quant (hat by James Wedge) on the cover of British Vogue, October 1, 1963. Photo: Brian Duffy. Image: eBay.

Nothing says Swinging London like Mary Quant. The pioneer of the Chelsea Look will receive a major retrospective at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2019. (An earlier exhibit, Manchester Art Gallery’s Mary Quant: Fashion Icon, had to close early due to conservation issues.)

Design for a cowl neck minidress with mustard yellow tights by Mary Quant, about 1967, London. Museum no. E.525-1975. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Mary Quant sketch, ca. 1967. Image: V&A.

The V&A is seeking vintage Quant for the show, including garments — or even photos of garments — made with Mary Quant patterns. See here for more details, or email the curators at maryquant@vam.ac.uk. Update: submissions are now closed.

Ensemble of bolero waistcoat and skirt, Mary Quant, about 1964. Museum no. T.34-2013. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Celia Hammond and Jean Shrimpton in Mary Quant, ca. 1964. Photo: John French. Image: V&A.
Mary Quant London - Made in England for Lord & Taylor 100% PVC label at the Costume Institute
Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Butterick licensed Mary Quant patterns from the mid-’60s to the early ’70s. (See my Mad Men-era post.)

Mary Quant pantdress pattern 4779 in the Butterick retail catalog, November 1969
Right: Mary Quant pantdress pattern 4779 in the Butterick retail catalogue, November 1969. Image: Etsy.

For knitters, there were also ultra-mod knitting patterns. Some of these vintage booklets are available as official reissues, like these ones from Mary Maxim. (More on Ravelry.)

1960s Patons Courtelle knitting patterns by Mary Quant
1960s Patons Courtelle knitting patterns by Mary Quant. Images: Mary Maxim.

Mary Quant and her husband were profiled in Life magazine as early as 1960. (View story here.)

Mary Quant and Alexander Plunkett-Greene photographed on Park Avenue by Ken Heyman for Life magazine, 1960
Mary Quant and Alexander Plunket Greene on Park Avenue, LIFE, December 5, 1960. Photo: Ken Heyman. Image: LIFE archive.

For his 1963 Life feature on the Chelsea Look, Norman Parkinson photographed Melanie Hampshire and Jill Kennington in these Mary Quant dresses:

Melanie Hampshire and Jill Kennington photographed by Norman Parksinson in Mary Quant's Bank of England and Eton striped wool dresses, LIFE magazine, 1963
Melanie Hampshire and Jill Kennington in Mary Quant’s Bank of England and Eton dresses, LIFE, October 18, 1963. Photo: Norman Parkinson. Image: Iconic Images.

Butterick released its first Mary Quant patterns in fall, 1964. Here’s Celia Hammond on the cover of the retail catalogue:

Butterick catalogue cover showing 3288 by Mary Quant - October 1964
Butterick 3288 by Mary Quant. Butterick catalogue, October 1964. Photo: Terence Donovan. Model: Celia Hammond. Image: eBay.

The Butterick Home Catalog hailed Quant as the originator of the Chelsea Look.

London: Mary Quant. A new group of Butterick designs by the originator of the Chelsea Look and winner o the International Fashion Award for Great Britain. Butterick Fall 1964 Quant
Mary Quant in the Butterick Home Catalog, Fall 1964.

The earliest Mary Quant patterns pre-date the Young Designer line. This dress pattern even includes the rosette:

1960s Mary Quant dress pattern Butterick 3499
Butterick 3499 by Mary Quant (1965) Image: PatternVault shop.

British copies of this dress pattern say “featured in Queen magazine.” Jill Kennington wore this and other Butterick Young Designers in what was billed as “The Queen’s first ever make-it-yourself fashion.”

1960s Mary Quant dress pattern Butterick 3716
Butterick 3716 by Mary Quant (ca. 1965)
1960s Jean Muir of Jane & Jane and Mary Quant dress patterns Butterick 3722, 3707, 3716
“How to be a self made sensation.” Right, Jill Kennington in Butterick 3716 by Mary Quant. Queen magazine, August 11, 1965. Image: eBay.

Here Moyra Swan models a mod scooter dress. Suggested fabrics include linen, jersey, lightweight wool, and knits.

1960s Mary Quant dress pattern Butterick 4578
Butterick 4578 by Mary Quant (ca. 1967) Image: PatternVault shop.

This jumpsuit or playsuit came with a matching mini skirt — “the latest put-togethers”:

Butterick 5404 by Mary Quant (1969) Image: Etsy.

What to wear with a Mary Quant mini dress? Why, go-go boots, of course:

1960s Mary Quant dress pattern Butterick 5475
Butterick 5475 by Mary Quant (1969)

By 1970, a Quant jumpsuit was more fluid, with a pointed collar; this pattern also includes a maxi-length cardigan. The catalogue gives a better view of the inflatable chair:

1970s Mary Quant jumpsuit and cardigan pattern Butterick 5857
Butterick 5857 by Mary Quant (1970) Image: Etsy.
Mary Quant's Butterick 5857 jumpsuit in the Fall 1970 catalogue
Mary Quant’s Butterick 5857 jumpsuit in the Fall 1970 catalogue. Image: tumblr.

Mary Quant in a more romantic mode means a sheer tunic worn with knickers. View B is a maxi dress.

1970s Mary Quant pattern Butterick 6256
Butterick 6256 by Mary Quant (ca. 1971)

After 1971 or so, Butterick Young Designer patterns had illustrations, not photos. This Mary Quant dress dates to circa early ’73.

1970s Mary Quant dress pattern Butterick 6916
Butterick 6916 by Mary Quant (ca. 1973) Image: Etsy.

Have you made anything from a Mary Quant pattern?

Maren Greve in Butterick 4128 by Mary Quant, 1966
Butterick 4128 by Mary Quant, Butterick catalogue, October 1966. Model: Maren Greve. Image: Instagram.

Pertegaz 1918-2018

Pertegaz (Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2004) Model: Laura Ponte. Photo: Antoni Bernad
Pertegaz (Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2004) Model: Laura Ponte. Photo: Antoni Bernad. Image: The Cary Collection.

Manuel Pertegaz was born on this day in 1918. Paco Peralta asked me to contribute to his post for the designer’s centenary; see it here.

PERTEGAZ biography - Vogue 2375 envelope flap

Suzy Parker wearing a bow-tied coat by Pertegaz at the Villa-Rose restaurant in Madrid
Suzy Parker wearing a coat by Pertegaz, Vogue, March 15, 1954. Photo: Henry Clarke. Image: Condé Nast.
Iberia flight uniform by Manuel Pertegaz, 1968
Rosa Real, made-to-measure Iberia flight uniform by Manuel Pertegaz, 1968. Image: Iberia.
Model in the El Mirador de Lindaraja inside the Alhambra, Spain wearing a caftan gown
Moyra Swan wears a Pertegaz caftan gown in the Alhambra, Vogue, October, 1968. Photo: Henry Clarke. Image: Condé Nast.

Patterns in Vogue: Where There’s Sun There’s Silk

Vogue UK May1966 V6468
Detail, British Vogue, May 1966. Photo: Helmut Newton. Image: Youthquakers.

A mid-1960s Helmut Newton editorial features a leopard and a Vogue pattern.

The model on the right wears Vogue 6468’s beach coverup in white guipure from Ilo Lace. (Left: blue mini dress by John Bates at Jean Varon; Paco Rabanne earrings.)

Vogue 6468 "Where there's sun there's silk."
British Vogue, May 1966. Photo: Helmut Newton. Image: Youthquakers.

For the full editorial see Youthquakers.

1960s bathing suit and cover-ups pattern Vogue 6468
Vogue 6468 (1965) Image: Etsy.