Halston of Bergdorf Goodman – Vogue 7082

June 14, 2016 § 3 Comments

Detail, Vogue 7082 by Halston of Bergdorf Goodman

Royal Ascot begins today. Here’s a look at an Ascot-worthy Halston pattern.

Halston licensed millinery designs with Vogue Patterns during his time as Chief Milliner at Bergdorf Goodman. (See my earlier Mad Men-era millinery post.) Vogue 7082 is a petal headpiece with optional veil:

1960s Halston of Bergdorf Goodman bridal headpiece pattern - Vogue 7082

Vogue 7082 by Halston of Bergdorf Goodman (ca. 1967)

Here’s the envelope description: Bridal headpiece. Large or small petal headpiece with or without long or short veil is secured to hair with comb; optional ribbon bow. Recommended fabrics: organdy, organza, lace, point d’esprit. Veil: net, tulle. Notions: comb, millinery wire, 2 1/4″ ribbon.

The Halston headpiece was cross-promoted on two bridal patterns, Vogue 1744 and Vogue 1745, as an option for both brides and bridesmaids. Or as a contemporary catalogue has it, “Enchanting bouquet of graduated petals… crowning touch for any member of the bridal party by Halston of Bergdorf Goodman.”

1960s bride's or bridesmaid's dress pattern Vogue Special Design 1745

Vogue 1745 (ca. 1967) Image via eBay.

Worn with a matching suit, wouldn’t it be perfect for a day at the races?

1960s dress and jacket pattern Vogue Special Design 7061

Vogue 7061 (ca. 1967) Image via Etsy.

Advertisements

Richard Avedon and Sally Victor: Simplicity Pattern Book, 1950

November 29, 2015 § 5 Comments

1950s Simplicity Pattern Book detail

Photo: Richard Avedon. Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

During his early period as a fashion photographer, Richard Avedon (1923-2004) did some work for Simplicity, including the Fall-Winter 1950 issue of Simplicity Pattern Book:

Fall-Winter 1950 Simplicity Patterb Book - cover by Richard Avedon

Simplicity Pattern Book, Fall-Winter 1950. Photo: Richard Avedon. Image via vintage4me2 on eBay.

The suit is Simplicity 3310, made in Botany flannels and worn with “[m]atching hat designed for Simplicity by Sally Victor,” Simplicity 3322.

Inside, the hat is shown photographed by Halley Erskine:

1950s Sally Victor hat pattern Simplicity 3322 in Simplicity Pattern Book

Make your own hat from a Sally Victor design. Simplicity Pattern Book, Fall-Winter 1950. Photos: Halley Erskine.

The back cover is a Botany ad, apparently from the same Avedon photo shoot:

1950s Botany ad featuring Simplicity 3322 and 3310

Botany advertisement on the back cover of Simplicity Pattern Book, Fall-Winter 1950.

I have a Canadian copy of Simplicity 3322 in the shop, printed with a special Chatelaine magazine logo:

1950s Sally Victor hat and bag pattern, Simplicity 3322

Simplicity 3322 by Sally Victor (1950) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

For more on Sally Victor see my Mad Men-era millinery post.

Fur Cloth for Fall

November 10, 2015 § 8 Comments

Anne St. Marie photographed in Vogue 1019,

Anne St. Marie wears Vogue 1019 by Jacques Griffe, Vogue Pattern Book, August/September 1961. Photo: Kazan.

Whether you call it fake or faux, this season’s fur trend is only fashion’s latest take on synthetic fur.

Many vintage sewing patterns call for fur banding and fur cloth. The reversible coat shown above, Vogue 1019 by Jacques Griffe, is fully lined with the latest black, synthetic fox fur. (Hover for full caption.) More recently there’s Donna Karan’s coat for low-pile fake fur, Vogue 1365, from the Fall 2012 collection:

Joan Smalls wears a faux fur coat from Donna Karan FW 2012

Model: Joan Smalls. Image: vogue.com.

Here’s a look at vintage patterns that call for fur trim or fur cloth, with an emphasis on the trendy, unusual, and outrageous.

1920s

From Winter 1926, this dolman coat by Martial et Armand has a deep fur collar and narrow fur banding at the cuffs:

1920s Martial et Armand coat McCall 4667 illustrated in the Winter 1926 McCall Quarterly

McCall 4667 by Martial et Armand in McCall Quarterly, Winter 1926-27. Image courtesy of Debby Zamorski.

This opulent, late 1920s evening wrap calls for a length of 4.5″ fur banding. A reproduction is available from EvaDress:

Late 1920s evening wrap pattern - McCall 5945

McCall 5945 (1929) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

1930s

Thirties patterns show many creative uses of fur trim. These two ca. 1933 coats both call for fur cloth accents. McCall 7206 has an attached scarf and contrast lower sleeves, shown in synthetic Persian lamb, while McCall 7207 has a deep fur collar and matching, triangular sleeve patches:

McCall 7206, 7207 Spring 1933 coats

Two coat patterns, McCall 7206 and 7207, illustrated in McCall Fashion Book, Spring 1933.

Simplicity 1541’s dramatic, curving collar and pointed cuffs can be made in contrast fur cloth; the fur-trimmed version was illustrated on the cover of the holiday 1934 issue of Simplicity Pattern Magazine. A reproduction is available from the Vintage Pattern Lending Library:

Via eBay

Simplicity 1541 (1934) Image: eBay.

From the autumn of 1939, McCall 3420 is a swagger coat with built-up neckline and optional, tapered lower sleeves and semi-circular shoulder insets. View A is shown in faux Astrakhan (matching hat unfortunately not included):

1930s coat pattern shown in check or faux Astrakhan - McCall 3420

McCall 3420 (1939)

1940s

McCall 3875, a World War 2-era swing coat, can be made with elbow-deep fur cuffs:

1940 coat pattern - McCall 3875

McCall 3875 (1940) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

This wartime cape pattern, previously featured in my vintage capes post, includes an evening cape with stand-up fur collar:

1940s cape pattern in evening or street length - McCall 4134

McCall 4134 (1941)

1950s

High-end postwar sewing patterns sometimes assume natural fur will be used and direct the home dressmaker to a specialist. From November 1949, Vogue 1075 is one of the earliest Balmain patterns. The voluminous “melon” sleeves can be made in fur contrast; the envelope back says, “Note: Have fur sleeves made by furrier”:

1940s Balmain coat pattern - Vogue 1075

Vogue 1075 by Balmain (1949) Image: Etsy.

This Vogue Couturier design includes a wide-necked evening coat with big fur collar and elbow-length sleeves:

1950s evening dress and coat with fur top-collar - Vogue 190

Vogue 190 (1959) Image: Etsy.

1960s

From Nina Ricci, Vogue 1217’s cape has a broad shawl collar that can be made in faux fur:

1960s Nina Ricci dress and coat pattern - Vogue 1217

Vogue 1217 by Nina Ricci (1963) Image: Etsy.

Vogue 1897 is a design from Yves Saint Laurent’s Fall/Winter 1967-68 haute couture collection, inspired by Queen Christina (see Paco’s post here). The fur-trimmed evening cape requires a taffeta stay for the fur trim unless made by a furrier:

1960s Yves Saint Laurent Queen Christina evening dress and cape pattern - Vogue 1897

Vogue 1897 by Yves Saint Laurent (1968) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

1970s

David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago (1965) seems to have prompted a fashion for Cossack coats and hats. Vogue-Butterick had Vogue 1983, and McCall’s had this fur-trimmed coat pattern:

1970s red, fur-trimmed coat pattern - McCall's 2676

McCall’s 2676 (1970) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

There was even a pattern for fur hats for men, women, and children, McCall’s 2966:

1970s faux fur hat and bag pattern - McCall's 2966

McCall’s 2966 (1971) Image: eBay.

1980s

Eighties excess brought the more-is-more aesthetic to designs for synthetic fur. McCall’s 7736 is a raglan-sleeved jacket for lightweight fake fur or woolens:

1980s jacket pattern - McCall's 7736

McCall’s 7736 (1981) Image: Etsy.

From the Connoisseur Collection, Simplicity 7078 is for fake fur only:

1980s faux fur coat pattern in 2 lengths - Simplicity 7078

Simplicity 7078 (1985) Image: Etsy.

In addition to a hat and stole for fur-like fabrics, accessories pattern Vogue 9981 includes a muff with concealed pocket:

1980s hat, stole, and muff pattern - Vogue 9981

Vogue 9981 (1987) Image: Etsy.

1990s

The 1990s were another good time for synthetic fur—so good that Vogue Patterns licensed a designer specializing in faux fur outerwear. Not quite vintage, this reversible coat pattern by Issey Miyake calls for high pile fake fur:

1990s Issey Miyake reversible faux fur coat pattern - Vogue 2182

Vogue 2182 by Issey Miyake (1998) Image: Etsy.

From Alexander McQueen’s Fall 1998 ready-to-wear collection for Givenchy, Vogue 2228’s jacket has a fur-trimmed hem and large, standing fur collar that recalls the 1940s evening cape shown above. (See my earlier McQueen post here.) I have one copy for sale in the shop:

1990s Givenchy fur-trimmed suit pattern by Alexander McQueen - Vogue 2228

Vogue 2228 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1998) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

Vogue 2233’s fur-trimmed dress and jacket are from Anna Sui’s Fall/Winter 1998 collection (click to purchase from the shop):

1990s Anna Sui fur-trimmed dress & jacket pattern - Vogue 2233

Vogue 2233 by Anna Sui (1998) Image: PatternVault on Etsy.

Vogue 2233 is one of the most ’90s patterns ever: Björk meets Britpop. The jacket was worn on the runway by Kirsty Hume—hat by James Coviello:

Kirsty Hume on the runway, Anna Sui FW 1998

Kirsty Hume, Anna Sui FW 1998. Image: firstVIEW.

There was also a pattern for Anna Sui faux-fur accessories, Vogue 7950 (see my earlier Anna Sui series).

Tips for sourcing synthetic fur

  • Tissavel: This luxury French faux fur mill is unfortunately now closed, but ends can be found on Etsy.
  • Faux Persian lamb/Astrakhan: Available as a special order from Emma One Sock.
  • Fur banding: Mokuba carries high-quality synthetic fur banding in various widths.

Working with vintage furs and synthetic fur

Vintage patterns often direct the home dressmaker to a furrier; old sewing books and magazines also provide tips for refashioning vintage furs. (Woman’s Day 5045 came with a special instruction booklet and fur needle.) Claire Shaeffer’s Fabric Sewing Guide includes a chapter on fur.

For tips on sewing with synthetic fur, see Claire Shaeffer’s Fabric Sewing Guide, Fehr Trade’s post, and Shannon Gifford’s post for Emma One Sock.

Patricia Underwood: Vogue Patterns

June 16, 2015 § 5 Comments

Reese Witherspoon by Tim Walker. Hat by Patricia Underwood, W February 2015

Reese Witherspoon wears a hat by Patricia Underwood, W magazine, February 2015. Photo: Tim Walker. Image via the Fashion Spot.

In celebration of Royal Ascot, which begins today, this post is devoted to millinery designer Patricia Underwood.

Patricia Underwood (b. 1947) was born near Ascot in Maidenhead, England. After moving to New York City in the late 1960s, she took a millinery course at FIT on a whim; by 1976 she had founded her own company. Underwood is known for minimalist, updated versions of traditional hat styles.

Image via the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As well as designing for her own label, Underwood has designed hats for major American designers such as Bill Blass, Perry Ellis, Marc Jacobs, Donna Karan, Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, and Oscar de la Renta. The milliner has also designed for film and theatre. Her career is the subject of a new book, Patricia Underwood: The Way You Wear Your Hat (Rizzoli, 2015).

Fiona (Kristin Scott Thomas) in a Patricia Underwood hat, with Charles (Hugh Grant) in Four Weddings and a Funeral

Kristin Scott Thomas wears a Patricia Underwood hat in Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) Image via 50 Anos de Filmes.

Jeffrey Banks and Doria de la Chapelle, Patricia Underwood: The Way You Wear Your Hat (2015) Image via Rizzoli.

Patricia Underwood has had a licensing agreement with Vogue Patterns since the mid-1990s. The earliest Patricia Underwood pattern I’ve seen is Vogue 9082, a pattern for five lined hats and two ascots. View A has a contrast under-brim in faux fur:

1990s Patricia Underwood hat pattern - Vogue 9082

Vogue 9082 by Patricia Underwood (1994) Image via Etsy.

Vogue 9207 includes five hats and a shawl. Views A and B have Underwood’s signature broad brim, while view E is a turban for stretch knits:

1990s Patricia Underwood pattern - Vogue 9207

Vogue 9207 by Patricia Underwood (1995) Image via Etsy.

Bridal millinery pattern Vogue 7242 has a variety of headpiece and veil combinations, as well as a headband, hair ornament, and floral wreath:

Patricia Underwood bridal headpiece and veils pattern - Vogue 7242

Vogue 7242 by Patricia Underwood (2000) Image via Betsy Vintage.

Patiricia Underwood bridal pattern - crown and hair ornament, Vogue 7242

Vogue 7242 by Patricia Underwood (2000) Image via Etsy.

Vogue 8844 includes four day styles of hat; View A may be worn like a trilby, with upturned back brim. The recommended fabrics are nylon, ripstop, velvet/velveteen, tweed, wool/wool blends and synthetic suede:

Patricia Underwood hat pattern - Vogue 8844

Vogue 8844 by Patricia Underwood (2012) Image via Etsy.

Recent pattern Vogue 8891 includes five more formal styles, all lined in tulle: a cloche, wide and smaller brim hats, and a fascinator (view C) like a miniature pork pie hat. This pattern is still in print:

Patricia Underwood hat pattern - Vogue 8891

Vogue 8891 by Patricia Underwood (2013) Image via Etsy.

For more on millinery patterns, see my previous Ascot posts on Frederick Fox and Stephen Jones.

Mr. John Millinery Patterns

April 5, 2015 § 6 Comments

Mr. John hat photographed by Edwin Blumenfeld for the cover of British Vogue, April 1951

China blue velvet beret designed by Mr. John of New York; interpreted by R.M. Hats for Marshall and Snelgrove. British Vogue, April 1951. Photo: Edwin Blumenfeld. Image via Vogue UK.

Born in Munich, celebrity milliner Hans Harberger, a.k.a. Mr. John (1902-1993), founded his New York salon in 1948. (For bio see my earlier post, 25 Jahre Mauerfall; on the complex history of Mr. John’s name and label see my Mad Men-era millinery post, or read his obituary in the Independent.)

Millinery patterns by Mr. John were available from Vogue in the first half of the 1950s. There were also mail-order Mr. John patterns from Spadea and Prominent Designer, as well as garment patterns from Advance. Vogue’s later John-Frederics patterns date to the tenure of Mr. John’s former partner, Frederick Hirst.

1950s Mr. John silk hat with hat box

Mr. John silk hat with hat box (ca. 1950). Image via the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

From 1952, Vogue 7908 is a cloche with elegant shaped brim. The brim could be worn down or folded up on one side:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 7908

Vogue 7908 by Mr. John (1952) Image via eBay.

Vogue 7909 is a beret that dips to a point on one side, with an optional chin strap:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 7909

Vogue 7909 by Mr. John (1952) Image via eBay.

Vogue 7909 was still available the following year, as seen in this 1953 illustration for Ladies’ Home Journal. The lower two hats are by Mr. John:

1950s Vogue hat patterns illustrated in Ladies Home Journal, March 1953

Top: Vogue 7738 and 7929. Bottom: Vogue 7962 and 7909 by Mr. John. Ladies’ Home Journal, March 1953.

Vogue 7961 is a draped cloche, striking in striped fabric:

1950s Mr. Joh hat pattern - Vogue 7961

Vogue 7961 by Mr. John (1953) Image via the Vintage Pattern Wiki.

Vogue 8441 is a shirred, draped turban, recommended for jersey:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 8441

Vogue 8441 by Mr. John (1954) Image via Etsy.

From 1955, Vogue 8546 is gathered at the sides into a narrow brim that crosses in the back:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 8546

Vogue 8546 by Mr. John (1955) Image via eBay.

Vogue 8547 is a pill box with front pleat and optional ribbon ties:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 8547

Vogue 8547 by Mr. John (1955) Image via Etsy.

In the later 1950s, Mr. John designed six spring hats for Everywoman’s magazine. Carmen (Carmine) Schiavone photographed one of them for the cover of the Easter issue:

A Mr. John creation on the cover of Everywoman's magazine, April 1957

Everywoman’s, April 1957. Photo: Carmen Schiavone. Image via Pattern Peddler.

The patterns, which were available to readers by mail order, were home-tested by a New York homemaker (click to enlarge):

Make a Mr. John hat for Easter. Photos: Carmen Schiavone

Make a Mr. John hat for Easter. Photos: Carmen Schiavone. Image via Pattern Peddler.

Six Mr. John hat patterns available from Everywoman's magazine

Six Mr. John hat patterns available from Everywoman’s magazine. Photos: Carmen Schiavone. Image via Pattern Peddler.

Many of Mr. John’s hat patterns are available as reproductions on Etsy.

I’ll close with two Vogue covers featuring Mr. John hats:

A Mr. John hat photographed by Irving Penn for the cover of British Vogue, September 1951

Lisa Fonssagrives wears a hat by Mr. John, British Vogue, September 1951. Photo: Irving Penn. Image via Vogue UK.

Isabella Albonico photographed by Irving Penn in a Mr. John hat and scarf set for Vogue, March 1, 1961

Isabella Albonico wears a hat and scarf by Mr. John, Vogue, March 1961. Photo: Irving Penn.

For more hats by Mr. John, see Kristine/dovima is divine’s set on flickr.

Happy Easter, everyone!

25 Jahre Mauerfall

November 30, 2014 § 3 Comments

Lissy Schaper in an ensemble by Staebe-Seger, Brandenburg Gate

Lissy Schaper in an ensemble by Staebe-Seger, Film und Frau 3, 1961. Photo: F.C. Gundlach. Image via Suites Culturelles.

To mark this month’s anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, here’s a look at three postwar German designers who licensed their work to Vogue Patterns.

Celebrity milliner Mr. John was born Hans Harberger in Munich. He moved to New York in the 1920s, opening a salon with partner Frederick Hirst; the Mr. John salon was founded when the milliner went solo in 1948. (On the complex history of Mr. John’s name and label see my Mad Men-era millinery post, or read his obituary in the Independent.) Mr. John hat patterns were available from Vogue in the 1950s. Vogue 7909 is a beret that dips to a point on one side, with an optional chin strap:

1950s Mr. John hat pattern - Vogue 7909

Vogue 7909 by Mr. John (1952) Image via eBay.

Born in Hamburg, Alke Boker moved to New York City in the 1970s after the death of her husband. She spent a few years designing for Pierre Cardin before founding her own label in the early 1980s. This Vogue Individualist pattern includes a pullover, bias dress with seven-eighths sleeves and separate hood. The model is Wanakee Pugh:

1980s Alke Boker dress pattern - Vogue Individualist 1439

Vogue 1439 by Alke Boker (1984) Image via Etsy.

Also from Hamburg, Karl Lagerfeld made his career in Paris, working as head designer at Patou and Chloé before establishing his own company in 1984. Vogue Patterns soon made a licensing agreement for Lagerfeld sewing patterns which continued into the 1990s. From 1989, Vogue 2407 is a formal dress-and-overdress ensemble that can be tied in front or back:

1980s Karl Lagerfeld evening pattern - Vogue 2407

Vogue 2407 by Karl Lagerfeld (1989) Image via Etsy.

The Berlin fashion photos in this post are by West German photographer F.C. Gundlach. Click the link to visit the foundation devoted to his work, or the photos to read more about his fashion photography.

Das Kind ruft die Mäuse graffiti - Kreuzberg, Berlin

Kreuzberg, Berlin. Photo: F.C. Gundlach. Image via Suites Culturelles.

And the Winner Is…

July 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

Detail from McCall Style News, January 1939. Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

The results of my random number generator are in! The lucky number is 20, and the winner of my blogiversary giveaway of a choice of 5 PatternVault e-booklets is:

sewsable (the 20th person to comment—Rachelle of Warming crafts)

Congratulations, Rachelle! I’ll send you an e-mail with the details on claiming your e-booklets.

Thank you so much to everyone who entered the giveaway. Thanks especially for all of your kind regards, suggestions, and feedback! The most-mentioned favourite post types/topics were the designer histories and vintage hats and accessories. You can expect more pattern history and millinery in the coming months.

As a thank you to all of you, I’m having a flash sale in my Etsy shop through this Sunday, July 20th—25% off with coupon code YEARTHETHIRD.

Detail from Vogue Patterns leaflet, December 1931. Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with millinery at PatternVault.

%d bloggers like this: