Tania Mallet

Tania Mallet photographed by Brian Duffy for British Vogue, 1963
Tania Mallet wears Mary Quant and James Wedge on the cover of British Vogue, October 1, 1963. Photo: Brian Duffy. Image: eBay.

Model and Bond girl Tania Mallet (b. 1941) was born in Blackpool to English and Russian-English parents. (Her mother, Olga Mironoff, was Helen Mirren’s paternal aunt.) She began working as a model in the late 1950s after taking a course at the Lucie Clayton Charm Academy. You may recognize her from her role as Tilly Masterson in Goldfinger (1964).

Tania Mallet as Tilly Masterson in Goldfinger (1964)
Tania Mallet as Tilly Masterson in Goldfinger (1964). IMDb image ©Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

Mallet’s modelling work in the 1960s included editorials for Vogue patterns and Vogue Knitting Book.

Tania Mallet in Vogue Knitting Book no. 60 (Jubilee edition), 1962
Tania Mallet in Vogue Knitting Book no. 60 (Jubilee edition), 1962. Image: Etsy.

The earliest patterns I’ve found featuring Mallet are by French and Italian designers—Jacques Heim and Simonetta:

1960s Jacques Heim suit pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Paris Original 1258
Vogue 1258 by Jacques Heim (1963) Image: Pinterest.
1960s Simonetta dress and coat pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1265
Vogue 1265 by Simonetta (1963) Image: eBay.

Later patterns are by London designers like Ronald Paterson and Jo Mattli:

1960s Ronald Paterson dress pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1391
Vogue 1391 by Ronald Paterson (1964) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.
1960s Jo Mattli dress and coat pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1407
Vogue 1407 by Jo Mattli (1964) Image: Etsy.
1960s Jo Mattli two-piece dress pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1661
Vogue 1661 by Jo Mattli (ca. 1967) Image: Etsy.

This daffodil evening ensemble was featured in my Bellville Sassoon post:

1960s Belinda Bellville evening ensemble pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1677
Vogue 1677 by Belinda Bellville (ca. 1966) Image: Etsy.

Here Mallet wears a goddess gown by John Cavanagh:

1960s John Cavanagh evening gown pattern feat. Tania Mallet, Vogue Couturier Design 1687
Vogue 1687 by John Cavanagh (ca. 1966) Image: eBay.

In this ad for Sekers Fabrics, she wears Forquet gown Vogue 1693 in striped ‘Hero’ lurex:

Tania Mallet wears Vogue 1693 by Federico Forquet in striped lurex (with Vogue 1758 by Ronald Paterson and Vogue 7158)
Tania Mallet wears Vogue 1693 by Federico Forquet (with Vogue 1758 by Ronald Paterson and Vogue 7158). Sekers Fabrics advertisement, 1967.

Full marks for hats and coiffure, don’t you think?

Tania Mallet photographed by Eugene Vernier for the cover of British Vogue, 1961
Tania Mallet in Pucci on the cover of British Vogue, July 1961. Photo: Eugene Vernier. Image: Vogue UK.
Tania Mallet photographed by Harry Meerson forthe cover of Jardin des Modes, 1962
Tania Mallet in Pierre Cardin on the cover of Jardin des Modes, March 1962. Photo: Harry Meerson. Image: Jardin des Modes Covers.
Tania Mallet photographed by Henry Clarke for the cover of British Vogue, 1962 (Brania earrings)
Tania Mallet on the cover of British Vogue, July 1962. Photo: Henry Clarke. Image: eBay.

Celia Hammond

Celia Hammond in Paco Rabanne, British Vogue May 1966. Photo by David Bailey
Celia Hammond in Paco Rabanne. British Vogue, May 1966. Photo: David Bailey. Image: Vogue UK.

Born in Indonesia, Celia Hammond was discovered by Norman Parkinson in the early 1960s and went on to build a career as a top model in Paris and Swinging London.

Vogue special beauty issue with cover model Celia Hammond, June 1967
British Vogue, June 1967. Photo: David Bailey. Image: Vogue UK.

Hammond may be seen on many designer patterns from Vogue and Butterick from the mid-1960s, always by British designers.

Here she models an LBD with dropped waist and bow-trimmed overblouse by Michael of London (Michael Donéllan):

1960s Michael of London dress pattern - Vogue 1330
Vogue 1330 by Michael (1964) Image: The Blue Gardenia.

Hammond modelled for patterns by a few British designers licensed to Butterick’s new Young Designers line, including the first Mary Quant patterns. Here she poses in a Quant dress, Butterick 3288, on a Butterick catalogue cover shot by Terence Donovan:

Butterick catalogue cover showing 3288 by Mary Quant - October 1964
Butterick 3288 by Mary Quant; Butterick catalogue, October 1964. Photo: Terence Donovan. Image: eBay.

Jean Muir designed this button-trimmed, mustard-yellow dress for her early label, Jane & Jane:

1960s Jean Muir dress pattern - Butterick 4153
Butterick 4153 by Jean Muir (ca. 1965) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Hammond also appears on this popular Jean Muir dress pattern, Butterick 4577:

1960s Jean Muir dress pattern - Butterick 4577
Butterick 4577 by Jean Muir (ca. 1967) Image: Etsy.

Here she models a suede-trimmed ensemble by Jo Mattli:

1960s Jo Mattli suit pattern - Vogue 1664
Vogue 1664 by Jo Mattli (1966) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

This evening dress from Belinda Bellville has a shaped bodice and handy pockets:

1960s Belinda Bellville evening dress pattern - Vogue 1680
Vogue 1680 by Belinda Bellville (1966) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

By Ronald Paterson, this three-piece ensemble with cutaway jacket is chic in white matelassé with matching buttons:

1960s Ronald Paterson suit pattern - Vogue 1685
Vogue 1685 by Ronald Paterson (1967) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Richard Dormer photographed Hammond in these two Belinda Bellville designs. Vogue 1795 is an elegant, black-and-white day ensemble, while Vogue 1828 is a short evening dress with tiered, scalloped, bias overskirt:

1960s Belinda Bellville dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1795
Vogue 1795 by Belinda Bellville (1967) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.
1960s Belinda Bellville evening dress pattern - Vogue 1828
Vogue 1828 by Belinda Bellville (1967) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Here Hammond models another dress by Michael Donéllan, its blouson bodice slashed in back to reveal an attached camisole:

1960s Michael dress pattern - Vogue 1861 (1967)
Vogue 1861 by Michael of London (1967) Image: Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Hammond retired from modelling to devote herself full-time to her work for animal welfare; she remains active for this cause as the founder of the Celia Hammond Animal Trust.

Click the models tag to see more posts in my models series.

Mad Men Era 3: London’s Old Guard

English expats Lane and Rebecca Pryce (Jared Harris and Embeth Davidtz) in Mad Men, Season 3
Lane (Jared Harris) and Rebecca Pryce (Embeth Davidtz) in “Love Among the Ruins” (Mad Men, Season 3)

This week my series on designers of the Mad Men era continues with four couturiers associated with London: Ronald Paterson, John Cavanagh, Michael Donéllan, and Edward Molyneux. The first three, as heads of London couture houses in the postwar period, had their licensed designs released through Vogue’s Couturier line. (These designers aren’t all that well documented online; a useful print source is Amy de la Haye, ed., The Cutting Edge: 50 Years of British Fashion 1947-1997.)

Ronald Paterson (1917-1993)

Born in Scotland, Ronald Paterson moved to London in 1936 to attend the Picadilly Institute of Design. After winning a fashion design contest judged by Elsa Schiaparelli, he worked briefly at a London couture house until the beginning of the Second World War. Paterson established his own house in London in 1947. Following its 1968 closure the designer turned to costume work for films including the Bond movie “The Spy Who Loved Me” (1977). Paterson was known for his tweeds and tailoring.

Vogue 1302, modelled by Jean Shrimpton, is an example of one of my favourite types of early sixties ensembles: the suit consisting of a dress and matching jacket. The sleeveless dress has a bodice that’s gathered into the dropped back waistline, and the short jacket has a fabulous funnel neck, cuffed sleeves and the option for self bow trim at the waist:

1960s Ronald Paterson dress suit jacket pattern feat. Jean Shrimpton Vogue 1302
Vogue 1302 by Ronald Paterson (1964) Dress and jacket. Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

John Cavanagh (1914-2003)

The Irish-born John Cavanagh trained with Molyneux in London and Paris from 1932 to 1940. Starting in 1947 he worked as design assistant at Balmain until he established his own house in 1952. Cavanagh had an early success in his 1953 ‘Coronation’ collection, and his royal commissions included the Duchess of Kent’s wedding dress in 1961. (See photos and video of the Duke and Duchess of Kent’s wedding here.) In 1966 he shifted his focus from couture to ready-to-wear, and the house closed in 1974. Cavanagh was esteemed for his classic tailoring and evening wear.

Vogue 1347, another design modelled by Jean Shrimpton, is a wedding dress with optional cathedral-length train. The dress has a raised waist, wide three-quarter sleeves, and a rolled, stand-up collar. I love the extravagance of the Watteau train, and how the rolled cuffs match the collar:

1960s John Cavanagh wedding dress pattern - Vogue 1347
Vogue 1347 by John Cavanagh (1964) Wedding gown. Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Michael Donéllan (1915-1985)

Another Irish-born designer, Michael Donéllan is called Michael of England and, later, Michael of London on Vogue patterns. From the 1940s he was head designer at the venerable London house of Lachasse before establishing his own couture house, Michael of Carlos Place, in 1953. (Carlos Place was also home to the Incorporated Society of London Fashion Designers.) From 1961 Mr. Donéllan also worked as a design consultant for Marks & Spencer. The house closed in 1971. Michael Donéllan was called the Balenciaga of London for his elegant, uncluttered tailoring.

Vogue 1437 is an evening ensemble consisting of a short, bias evening dress and matching jacket with three-quarter sleeves and welt pockets. I like to think the hat serves to advertise the design’s Britishness:

1960s Michael of London (Michael Donéllan) evening suit pattern - Vogue 1437
Vogue 1437 by Michael of London (c. 1964) Evening dress and jacket. Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Molyneux (1891-1974)

Although Edward Molyneux is today’s most senior designer, I’ve left him to last because the house closed during the postwar period and didn’t reopen until the mid-1960s. The London-born Molyneux worked as a sketcher at Lucile from 1911 until the outbreak of the First World War. During his military service he lost an eye, and in 1917 he was made Captain, so you’ll sometimes see him referred to as Captain Molyneux. He established the house of Molyneux in Paris in 1919, moving his business to London during the Second World War. The house closed in 1950, with the Paris studio passing to Jacques Griffe; however, in 1964 Molyneux announced the relaunch of his label, presenting his first collection in early 1965. (For more on Molyneux’s comeback see Worn Through‘s recent post.) The designer retired a couple years later, leaving the business in the hands of his nephew. Molyneux’s work is famous for its spare, modern lines and understated luxury.

Vogue 1502, modelled by Simone D’Aillencourt, is a day dress with a contrasting ascot that’s framed by the shaped, stand-up collar. (Click on the image to see the technical drawing.) The design also features contrast trim inside the neck and sleeves (barely visible in the photo):

1960s Molyneux dress pattern with ascot - Vogue 1502
Vogue 1502 by Molyneux (1965) Dress with ascot. Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

The London College of Fashion has some pictures of Molyneux’s later work online, including this photo of the Vogue 1502 design:

Edward Molyneux 1965 dress model photo Vogue 1502
Dress by Molyneux in navy wool crepe by Nattier, 1965. Image via VADS.

It may be a truism to say that tailoring and evening wear are British strengths, designed for aristocratic social life, but Vogue’s selections do look perfect for the Season’s requirements…

Next: Old House, New Designer: Lanvin, Patou, Nina Ricci, and Dior.