Winter/Holiday 2018 Designer Pattern Highlights

Simplicity 8733 by Cynthia Rowley FW 2017 lookbook photo by William Eadon
A look from Cynthia Rowley Fall 2017. Photo: William Eadon. Image: Vogue Runway.

The new designer patterns for Winter/Holiday 2018 amp up the drama with sparkle and embellishment.

Vogue’s designer cover looks are by Badgley Mischka. Gracing both catalogue and magazine covers is Nadja Giramata, a Rwandan-French model represented by Elite New York.

Vogue 1604 by Badgley Mischka, Vogue Patterns lookbook, Winter/Holiday 2018. Model: Nadja Giramata. Image: McCall’s.

Here and on the retail catalogue cover, she wears Badgley Mischka’s strapless popover gown with back detail. The original is stretch crepe with velvet ribbon.

Vogue 1604 by Badgley Mischka
Vogue 1604 by Badgley Mischka (2018) Image: McCall’s.

The popover gown is from Badgley Mischka’s Fall 2017 collection, which was inspired by the women of the interwar period.

A look from Badgley Mischka's Fall 2017 collection
A look from Badgley Mischka’s Fall 2017 collection. Image: Vogue Runway.

Other versions of the gown omit the grommets and embellish the flounce with lace or appliqué. The white dress is cocktail length:

Guipure lace and appliqué details on two dresses from Badgley Mischka
Guipure lace and appliqué details on two dresses from Badgley Mischka. Images: The Outnet.

The second Badgley Mischka pattern is a top and skirt ensemble with pearl-embellished cuffs.

Nadja Giramata in V1605 by Badgley Mischka, Vogue Patterns, December/January 2018-19. Photo: Jack Deutsch. Image: McCall’s.

The designers used stretch velvet for the top and a lustrous satin for the draped evening skirt with bow accent.

Vogue 1605 by Badgley Mischka
Vogue 1605 by Badgley Mischka (2018) Image: McCall’s.

Photographer Jack Deutsch shared another shot of the ensemble on Instagram.

Ana Kondratjeva in Vogue 1605 by Badgley Mischka, 2018. Photo: Jack Deutsch via Instagram.

Combine the two looks and you get this current-season design:

Navy beaded sleeve popover gown, Badgley Mischka Fall 2018
Beaded sleeve popover gown, Badgley Mischka Fall 2018. Image: Badgley Mischka.

New from Paco Peralta: a three-quarter sleeved top and high-waisted skirt, shown in brown, sequinned tweed. The sculpted shapes reference early Pierre Cardin.

Vogue 1602 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1602 by Paco Peralta (2018) Image: McCall’s.

Look closely and you’ll see that all the side seams line up. This drawing shows an earlier version, without the princess seams:

Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1602 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1602 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.

From Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein, an open-front tuxedo jacket and skinny stretch pants. The originals were crepe and ponte knit.

Vogue 1606 by Anne Klein
Vogue 1606 by Anne Klein (2018) Image: McCall’s.

The minimalist jacket was available in colours including claret, bright red, and basic black. Here’s a similar stitched shawl collar as seen in the Spring 2016 campaign.

Vivien Solari in Anne Klein's Spring 2016 ad campaign. Photo: Nathaniel Goldberg
Vivien Solari in Anne Klein’s Spring 2016 ad campaign. Photo: Nathaniel Goldberg. Editor: Laura Ferrara. Image: Instagram.

Simplicity’s latest Cynthia Rowley design is a bell-sleeved dress with whimsical appliqués. The pattern also includes a top.

Simplicity 8733 by Cynthia Rowley
Simplicity 8733 by Cynthia Rowley (2018) Image: Simplicity.

The Rowley original is wool with metallic leather appliqués. William Eadon photographed it against a giant satin bow for the seasonal lookbook (at top of post).

Cynthia Rowley dress with appliqué detail, Fall 2017. Images: Moda Operandi.

The rose appliqués made other appearances in the collection: on a jumper and wide-leg trousers.

Cynthia Rowley Fall 2017
Cynthia Rowley Fall 2017. Photo: William Eadon. Image: vogue.com.

Bonus: From Vogue’s Fall release, a version of Alberta Ferretti’s Venetian coat:

V9340_a
Very Easy Vogue 9340 after Alberta Ferretti (2018) Image: McCall’s.

The version shown in Milan was midi length (view C) in unlined, mustard cashmere.

Yoon Young Bae in Alberta Ferretti FW 2017. Image: Vogue Runway.

The pattern’s centre-seam hood is adapted from the original.

Alberta Ferretti hooded bow tie coat, Fall 2017. Images: Moda Operandi.

The coat features in Tim Walker’s ad campaign, which was styled by none other than Carine Roitfeld, the former editor of Vogue Paris.

Lexi Boling in Alberta Ferretti Fall 2017 ad campaign. Photo: Tim Walker. Editor: Carine Roitfeld
Lexi Boling in Alberta Ferretti’s Fall 2017 ad campaign. Photo: Tim Walker. Editor: Carine Roitfeld. Image: Alberta Ferretti.

Hack the pattern for a hooded cape—in opulent velvet for festive soirées:

Lineisy Montero, Lexi Boling, and Kiki Willems in Alberta Ferretti Fall 2017 ad campaign. Photo: Tim Walker. Editor: Carine Roitfeld
Lineisy Montero, Lexi Boling, and Kiki Willems in Alberta Ferretti’s Fall 2017 ad campaign. Photo: Tim Walker. Editor: Carine Roitfeld. Image: Alberta Ferretti.

Fall 2018 Designer Pattern Highlights

Anne Klein FW2015
Vivien Solari in Anne Klein’s Fall 2015 ad campaign. Photo: Nathaniel Goldberg. Editor: Laura Ferrara. Image: Instagram.

Have you seen the new Fall patterns?

1597 Vogue Patterns lookbook Fall 2018
Scarlett Schoeffling in Vogue 1597 by Anne Klein, Vogue Patterns lookbook Fall 2018. Image: Issuu.

Vogue’s cover look is a cropped trench jacket by Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein. Trousers also included:

La Sena cropped trench - Vogue 1597 by Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein
Vogue 1597 by Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein (2018) Image: McCall’s.

The cropped trench is a signature Anne Klein piece, seen in the Fall ’15 (above) and Fall ’16 campaigns. (See my post on Vogue’s Winter/Holiday release.)

Anne Klein Fall 2016 ad campaign
Anne Klein Fall 2016 ad campaign. Photo: Annemarieke van Drimmelen. Model: Guinevere Van Seenus. Image: Behance.

From Badgley Mischka, a day-to-evening sheath dress, with cuffed sleeves cut in one with the bodice:

Vogue 1595 by Badgley Mischka
Vogue 1595 by Badgley Mischka (2018) Image: McCall’s.

The original is a navy poly-spandex crepe.

Navy crepe dress by Badgley Mischka. Image: Rent the Runway.

Brocade with a rose gold sparkle is the star of this Badgley Mischka cocktail dress with pleated sleeve flounces.

Vogue 1596 by Badgley Mischka
Vogue 1596 by Badgley Mischka (2018) Image: McCall’s.

A closeup view on the designers’ site, with a different pattern placement:

Detail, bell sleeve brocade cocktail dress by Badgley Mischka
Detail, bell sleeve brocade cocktail dress. Image: Badgley Mischka.

The flounce sleeve featured prominently in Badgley Mischka’s Fall 2017 collection—in black lace for the opening look.

Badgley Mischka FW 2017
Two looks from Badgley Mischka Fall 2017. Photos: Umberto Fratini / Vogue Runway.

Paco Peralta’s new design is an edgy LBD with two-way separating zipper.

Vogue 1593 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1593 by Paco Peralta (2018) Image: McCall’s.

Plus, a men’s shirt from the team at Koos van den Akker. Make in a single fabric if print mixing isn’t your thing.

Vogue 1599 by Koos van den Akker
Vogue 1599 by Koos van den Akker (2018) Image: McCall’s.

Pertegaz 1918-2018

Pertegaz (Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2004) Model: Laura Ponte. Photo: Antoni Bernad
Pertegaz (Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, 2004) Model: Laura Ponte. Photo: Antoni Bernad. Image: The Cary Collection.

Manuel Pertegaz was born on this day in 1918. Paco Peralta asked me to contribute to his post for the designer’s centenary; see it here.

PERTEGAZ biography - Vogue 2375 envelope flap

Suzy Parker wearing a bow-tied coat by Pertegaz at the Villa-Rose restaurant in Madrid
Suzy Parker wearing a coat by Pertegaz, Vogue, March 15, 1954. Photo: Henry Clarke. Image: Condé Nast.
Iberia flight uniform by Manuel Pertegaz, 1968
Rosa Real, made-to-measure Iberia flight uniform by Manuel Pertegaz, 1968. Image: Iberia.
Model in the El Mirador de Lindaraja inside the Alhambra, Spain wearing a caftan gown
Moyra Swan wears a Pertegaz caftan gown in the Alhambra, Vogue, October, 1968. Photo: Henry Clarke. Image: Condé Nast.

Paco Peralta: Vogue Patterns

Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1567 top and skirt pattern
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1567 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.

Paco Peralta has seen some major milestones lately. Last fall, the Barcelona couturier became Vogue Patterns’ first Spanish designer in half a century, and this year his blog, BCN – UNIQUE Designer Patterns, is celebrating a decade online. (Like Toronto’s YYZ, BCN is both the airport code for Barcelona and shorthand for the city itself.)

The licensing deal brings a new audience to Peralta’s precision-cut designs. Peralta himself was already a pillar of the online sewing community, both for his fine sewing tutorials and as a purveyor of couture patterns, all hand-traced in his studio not far from Gaudí’s Sagrada Família basilica.

Born in Huesca, Aragon, Peralta studied at Barcelona’s Institut Català de la Moda before apprenticing in some of the city’s couture ateliers, who kept alive the traditions of Balenciaga and Rodríguez. He became interested in commercial patterns in the 1980s, when a friend gave him a copy of Vestidal; his first pattern purchase was a Vogue Individualist design by Issey Miyake.

1980s Issey Miyake coat pattern Vogue 1476 by Issey Miyake (1984)
Vogue 1476 by Issey Miyake (1984) Model: Ariane Koizumi. Image: Etsy.

Peralta may also be the world’s foremost collector of Yves Saint Laurent patterns, and his blog doubles as a window into this private archive. As regular readers of this blog will recognize, any high fashion sewing history owes much to his work.

Yves Saint Laurent Vogue patterns: Vogue 1557 Mondrian dress; Vogue 2598 suit 1971
Couture designs from Yves Saint Laurent’s Mondrian and Libération collections. Images: Etsy / Paco Peralta.

Vogue Patterns introduced Peralta with two designs in last year’s holiday issue. (Click to enlarge.)

Paco Peralta feature in Vogue Patterns magazine, Dec/Jan 2016-17
Introducing Paco Peralta, Vogue Patterns, December/January 2016-17. Photo (L): Eric Hason. Image: Issuu.

You can skip the buttonholes with this short-sleeved jacket: it has a midriff inset instead. For the original ensemble, Peralta used a double-sided Italian wool twill-crepe for the jacket, wool-cashmere for the trousers, and for the shirt, a sturdy Egyptian cotton.

Vogue 1526 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1526 by Paco Peralta (2016) Photos: Eric Hason. Image: PatternVault shop.
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1526
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1526 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.

Peralta also used Italian satin-backed wool twill-crepe for his wrap skirt and coat-length jacket. The latter sports a tuxedo-style shawl collar, while the pussy-bow blouse, made in silk crepe de Chine, has French cuffs:

Vogue 1527 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1527 by Paco Peralta (2016) Photos: Eric Hason. Image: PatternVault shop.
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1527
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1527 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.

This tunic and pants ensemble was the summer bestseller. The long version is a heavy linen, while the short, gaucho version is a lightweight silk/rayon. Both have silk organza insets.

Vogue 1550 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1550 by Paco Peralta (2017) Photos: Tim Geaney.
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1550
Paco Peralta sketch for Vogue 1550 ©McCall’s/Paco Peralta.

For the holiday season, mix and match with party separates: a dolman-sleeved top and winter-weight handkerchief skirt, shown in cotton knit and silk-viscose duchesse satin.

Vogue 1567 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1567 by Paco Peralta (2017) Photo: Tim Geaney.
Image: McCall’s.

Coming soon: even more Paco Peralta designs exclusive to Vogue Patterns.

With thanks to my friend, Paco Peralta.
Tany's tartan V1567 by Paco Peralta with sew-in labels
Image: Tany’s Couture et Tricot.

Winter/Holiday 2017 Designer Highlights

A look from Adam Andrascik's Fall 2015 collection for Laroche. Photo: Yannis Vlamos
A look from Adam Andrascik’s Fall 2015 collection for Laroche. Photo: Yannis Vlamos. Image: Vogue.com.

From Guy Laroche to Paco Peralta, Vogue’s designer patterns for Winter/Holiday 2017 offer a range of festive looks for the coming season.

The new Guy Laroche is a skinny jean and party top, recommended for lamé:

Vogue 1573 by Adam Andrascik for Guy Laroche
Vogue 1573 by Adam Andrascik for Guy Laroche (2017) Image: McCall’s

The ensemble is the first pattern to be drawn from Adam Andrascik’s debut collection for Laroche.

V1573 by Adam Andrascik for Guy Laroche on the runway
V1573 by Adam Andrascik for Guy Laroche on the Fall 2015 runway. Photo: Yannis Vlamos. Image: Vogue.com.

Gleaming tartan jacquard is the star of this ensemble from Anne Klein, now designed by Sharon Lombardo:

Vogue 1571 by Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein
Vogue 1571 by Sharon Lombardo for Anne Klein (2017) Image: McCall’s.

Guinevere Van Seenus wore a similar look for the Fall 2016 campaign, photographed by Annemarieke van Drimmelen:

Anne Klein Fall 2016 ad campaign. Photo: Annemarieke van Drimmelen. Model: Guinevere Van Seenus. Image: Behance.

Like fall’s V1561 jacket, the two Zandra Rhodes offerings are from the Fall 2016 collection, which was sponsored by Kraftangan Malaysia. (Kraftangan is Malay for ‘handicraft.’) As always with Rhodes’ work, the focus is on textiles, here on a double-sided fabric such as metallic jacquard:

Vogue 1566 by Zandra Rhodes
Vogue 1566 by Zandra Rhodes (2017) Image: McCall’s.

Shot by Andrew Woffinden, the collection lookbook was styled by Grace Woodward with Nicholas Kirkwood shoes and a turban by Piers Atkinson:

Zandra Rhodes’ Songket dress, FW 2016. Photo: Andrew Woffinden. Editor: Grace Woodward. Image: Zandra Rhodes.

Vogue chose three of Rhodes’ Songket pieces—a dress, peplum top, and trousers—for the Winter/Holiday collection. Songket is a traditional metallic brocade produced in Southeast Asia.

Vogue 1572 by Zandra Rhodes
Vogue 1572 by Zandra Rhodes (2017) Image: McCall’s.
Zandra Rhodes’ Songket top, FW 2016. Photo: Andrew Woffinden. Editor: Grace Woodward. Image: Zandra Rhodes.
Zandra Rhodes’ Songket trousers, FW 2016. Photo: Andrew Woffinden. Editor: Grace Woodward. Image: Zandra Rhodes.

Paco Peralta’s latest design for Vogue is a dolman-sleeved knit top and handkerchief skirt. Festive and versatile, the skirt even has pockets:

Vogue 1567 by Paco Peralta
Vogue 1567 by Paco Peralta (2017) Image: McCall’s.

I have some Lurex in my stash, don’t you?

If you’re fresh out of shiny fabric, you might be interested in Gorgeous Fabrics’ farewell sale. Last weekend, owner Ann Steeves announced that she is closing shop after 11 years in business.

Amanda Murphy photographed by Lachlan Bailey in Laroche by Adam Andrascik, for Vogue Paris September 2015
Amanda Murphy wears Laroche by Adam Andrascik, Miss Vogue supplement, Vogue Paris, September 2015. Photo: Lachlan Bailey. Editor: Géraldine Saglio. Image: Guy Laroche.

Yves Saint Laurent for Dior: Vogue Patterns

Isabella Albonico photographed by Leombruno-Bodi in Dior pattern 1471 for Vogue, January 1st, 1960
Detail of Vogue 1471 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior, Vogue, January 1, 1960. Photo: Leombruno-Bodi.

For Paco Peralta.

Before Vogue Patterns introduced Yves Saint Laurent with patterns from the Mondrian collection, the company had already licensed the designer’s work for the house of Dior. (Read more at the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, or see Dustin’s post here.)

Yves Saint Laurent was appointed head designer at Dior after Christian Dior’s death in 1957. Dior had been his mentor; in 1955 he hired Saint Laurent to work at his new boutique, later promoting him to accessories and couture. Richard Avedon’s famous Dovima with Elephants shows a velvet evening dress designed by Yves Saint Laurent while he was still assistant designer:

Avedon's Dovima with Elephants and YSL sketch for Dior, 1955
Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris, 1955, and sketch by Yves Saint Laurent.

(Images: Enticing the Light and Encore! Life.)

Saint Laurent’s first collection for Dior, Trapèze (Spring 1958 haute couture), was a huge success, and his later work at the house continued its play with proportion. L’Officiel’s spring preview issue for 1958 featured an illustration of a Dior trapeze dress by René Gruau:

L'Officiel mars 1958: Gruau illustration of a black Dior trapeze dress
Christian Dior trapeze dress on the cover of L’Officiel, March 1958. Illustration: René Gruau. Image: jalougallery.com.

The young Yves Saint Laurent designed six haute couture collections for Dior; Vogue’s licensing represents his last three collections for the house, from 1959 to 1960.

Christian Dior label, fall-winter 1959 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Christian Dior label, automne-hiver 1959. Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art.

1. Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall/Winter 1959

Saint Laurent’s second Fall/Winter couture collection for Dior was controversial; L’Officiel declared its aesthetic “femininity pushed to the extreme.” Suits were shown with severely cropped jackets, and the skirt silhouettes included voluminous tiers and hobble skirts.

The first Dior patterns were promoted with illustrations by Esther Larson in the late 1959 issues of Vogue Pattern Book and Vogue Printed Pattern News (thanks to the White Cabinet for the ID):

Vogue 1472 on the cover of Vogue Pattern news for December 15th, 1959
Vogue Printed Pattern News, December 15, 1959. Illustration: Esther Larson.

Anticipating demand for this high-profile addition to Vogue’s designer patterns, Vogue Pattern Book noted that the new patterns would be available in stores after November 10th:

Esther Larson's illustrations of Dior patterns in Vogue Pattern Book, December 1959-January 1960.
Dior patterns in Vogue Pattern Book, December 1959-January 1960. Illustrations: Esther Larson. Image: Make Mine Vogue.

The first Dior patterns were photographed by Joseph Leombruno and Jack Bodi, the couple who worked as Leombruno-Bodi. In Vogue magazine’s first issue for 1960, Isabella Albonico modelled the two dress ensembles, Vogue 1471 and 1470:

For the first time Vogue patterns from designs by Dior. Vogue 1 Jan 1960
Vogue patterns from designs by Dior, Vogue, January 1, 1960. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi.

Leombruno-Bodi also photographed the new Dior patterns for Ladies’ Home Journal. The accompanying text for Vogue 1470 suggests that the hobble skirt silhouette was considered extreme: “Dior’s famous ‘hobble’ skirt makes a charming mid-season costume … The pattern also includes details on how to make the dress without the band at the bottom of the skirt for less extreme effect.” The model on the left is Anne St. Marie (click to enlarge):

Nora O'Leary, "Christian Dior: Yours for the Making," with hats by Vincent-Harmik, Maria Pia, and John Frederics - Ladies' Home Journal Jan 1960
Nora O’Leary, “Christian Dior: Yours for the Making,” Ladies’ Home Journal, January 1960. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi. Image: Internet Archive.

Vogue 1470 is a striking dress and jacket ensemble. The short jacket has three-quarter sleeves and bow trim at the waist, while the dress has short sleeves, low V-neckline, and the collection’s distinctive pouf-hobble skirt banded at the knee. The original was navy tweed:

1950s Christian Dior dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1470
Vogue 1470 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Dress and jacket.

Here’s the envelope description: One piece dress and jacket. Skirt, with or without puffed tunic, joins the bodice at the waistline. Wide V neck-line with band finish. Short kimono sleeves. Short fitted jacket, joined to waistband, has concealed fastening below notched collar; below elbow length sleeves. Novelty belt.

Vogue 1471 is a close-fitting, double-breasted jacket with matching dress. The original was black-and-white tweed:

1950s Christian Dior dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1471
Vogue 1471 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Image: Make Mine Vogue.

The envelope description reads: One piece dress and jacket. Flared skirt joins the bodice at the waist-line. Single button closing below the wide V neck-line with extension band finish. Above elbow length and short sleeves. Double breasted jacket has notched collar and below elbow length sleeves. Novelty belt for version A.

Vogue 1472 seems to have been the most popular of the three patterns. The voluminous coat and skirt suit were modelled by Nena von Schlebrügge:

1950s Christian Dior coat and suit pattern - Vogue 1472
Vogue 1472 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

Here’s the envelope description: Coat, suit and scarf. Double-breasted hip length jacket has a notched collar and below elbow length sleeves with buttoned vents. Slim skirt. Double-breasted, full coat in two lengths has a large shaped collar. Concealed pocket in side seams. Below elbow length sleeves joined to dropped shoulder armholes. Straight scarf.

In the next issue of Vogue Pattern Book, the Vogue 1472 coat is called “the newsmaking original Dior coat that tops the suit… Note the extras here: the enormous buttons, the slashed side seams, the stitched collar, the scarf to match. Your own extra: a towering cloche of the checked fabric”:

Photo of Nena von Schlebrügge in Vogue 1472 in Vogue Pattern Book Feb/Mar 1960
Vogue 1472 in Vogue Pattern Book, February/March 1960. Image: eBay.

2. Christian Dior Haute Couture Spring/Summer 1960

Saint Laurent’s Spring 1960 collection for Dior was characterized by rounded silhouettes and vibrant colour. L’Officiel noted its straight suits with jackets cut on the bias to achieve the suppleness of a knitted cardigan.

Vogue 1012, introduced in the August/September 1960 issue of Vogue Pattern Book, includes a collarless, single-breasted skirt suit and sleeveless blouse with crisscross back. The jacket in view A is cut on the bias:

1960s Christian Dior suit and blouse pattern - Vogue 1012
Vogue 1012 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1960) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

The envelope description reads: Suit and blouse. Short, straight jacket buttons below collarless away from normal neck-line. Welt pockets. Below elbow length kimono sleeves. Skirt has soft gathers from very shallow yoke. Easy fitting overblouse has shoulder straps crisscrossed at back.

This suit is similar to Vogue 1012, but has a more conventional button front:

Le tailleur dépouillé de Christian Dior, photographed by Philippe Pottier, L'Officiel 457-58 (1960)
Christian Dior’s pared-down suit, L’Officiel, April 1960. Photo: Philippe Pottier. Image: jalougallery.com.

These Guy Arsac editorial photos of a red “boule” coat and teal dress show the collection’s play with colour and silhouette:

Triomphe de la couleur, le manteau "Boule" de Christian Dior, Guy Arsac 1960 L'Officiel 455-56
“Boule” coat by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, March 1960. Photo: Guy Arsac. Image: jalougallery.com.
Dior silk dress by Yves Saint Laurent, Guy Arsac 1960 LOfficiel 457-58
Silk dress by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, April 1960. Photo: Guy Arsac. Image via jalougallery.com.

3. Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall/Winter 1960

Yves Saint Laurent’s controversial final collection for Dior, le Beat look, was inspired by Left Bank icon Juliette Gréco and the Beatniks of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. It was innovative for its infusion of youthful, bohemian street style into the couture, with Beat elements including leather jackets, knitted turtlenecks, and plenty of black.

Vogue produced two patterns from this collection, drawn from the more conventional designs. Vogue 1041 is a skirt suit and matching, loose coat with a big standing collar and side slits:

1960s Christian Dior suit and coat pattern - Vogue 1041
Vogue 1041 by Christian Dior (1960) Image: Vintage Pattern Wiki.

Here’s the envelope description: Suit and coat. Easy fitting jacket has high buttoned closing below neck-band. Vent opening in side front seams. Bracelet length and elbow length sleeves. Slightly gathered skirt has outside stitched front panel concealing pockets. Seven eighths length loose coat has opening in side seams. Away-from-neck-line standing neck-band. Bracelet length kimono sleeves.

Philippe Pottier photographed the purple coat ensemble for L’Officiel‘s winter collections issue:

Christian Dior tweed ensemble photographed by Philippe Pottier for L'Officiel octobre 1960
Christian Dior tweed ensemble, L’Officiel, October 1960. Photo: Philippe Pottier. Image: jalougallery.com

Vogue 1041 was photographed for Vogue magazine by Henry Clarke:

Vogue 1041 by Dior photographed by Henry Clarke - Vogue Nov 15th, 1960
Vogue 1041 in Vogue, November 15, 1960. Photo: Henry Clarke.
Vogue 1041 by Dior photographed by Henry Clarke - Vogue Nov 15th, 1960
Vogue 1041 in Vogue, November 15, 1960. Photo: Henry Clarke.

Vogue 1049 is a skirt suit and sleeveless overblouse. The blouse is worn over a barrel skirt with attached underbodice for a dropped-waist effect. The jacket of view A is designed to be worn open:

1960s Christian Dior suit pattern - Vogue 1049
Vogue 1049 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1961) Image: Etsy.

The envelope description reads: Suit and blouse. Box jacket has cut away fronts and simulated buttoned closing or complete buttoned closing, below standing band collar. Easy fitting overblouse with optional tied belt has bateau neck-line. Above elbow length sleeves and sleeveless. Slightly barrelled shaped skirt attached to bodice.

The dotted black ensemble in duchesse velvet was photographed for this Chatillon Mouly Roussel advertisement in L’Officiel:

Ensemble de Christian Dior en duchesse velours de Chatillon Mouly Roussel
Chatillon Mouly Roussel ad showing an ensemble by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, October 1960. Image: jalougallery.com.

I also found the black suit in a later L’Officiel composite:

A Dior suit by Yves Saint Laurent - Dior 1000modèles Beat
A Dior suit by Yves Saint Laurent, L’Officiel 1000 modèles no. 81 (2007). Image: jalougallery.com.

These William Klein editorial photos featuring Dior Fall 1960 designs capture the Beat collection’s youthful spirit:

Dorothea McGowan and Sara Thom in Dior, with Little Bara, photographed for Vogue by WIlliam Klein
Dorothea McGowan and Sara Thom in Dior, with Little Bara. Vogue, September 1960. Photo: William Klein. Image: Pleasurephoto.
Dorothea McGowan in Dior, with Little Bara, photographed for Vogue by WIlliam Klein
Dorothea McGowan in Christian Dior. Vogue, September 1960. Photo: William Klein. Image: The Fashion Spot.

For more of Yves Saint Laurent’s work for Dior see L’Officiel 1000 modèles’ Dior special issue.

Pedro Rodríguez: Catalogue of Maria Brillas’s Dresses

Pedro Rodríguez: Catalogue of Maria Brillas's Dresses / Catàleg dels vestits de Maria Brillias / Catálogo de los vestidos de Maria Brillas
Pedro Rodríguez: Catalogue of Maria Brillas’s Dresses (Museu Tèxtil i d’Indumentària de Barcelona, 2012)

Thanks to Paco Peralta,* I received a review copy of the new book from Museu Tèxtil i d’Indumentària de Barcelona, Pedro Rodríguez: Catalogue of Maria Brillas’s Dresses. The museum’s collection of Pedro Rodríguez’ work was recently expanded when it acquired the wardrobe of Maria Brillas (1905-1992), a Barcelona society lady who dressed exclusively in Rodríguez for much of her life.

Què em poso? el guarda-roba de Maria Brillas per Pedro Rodríguez
Image: Paco Peralta.

Brillas’ extensive wardrobe—over 300 pieces, from the 1920s to the 1970s—covers most of Rodríguez’ career, and in 2011 the collection was the subject of a major exhibition, ¿Qué me pongo? El guardarropa de Maria Brillas por Pedro Rodríguez (What to Wear? Maria Brillas’ wardrobe by Pedro Rodríguez). The book concludes the museum’s project of cataloguing the new collection.

As I found when preparing a brief discussion of Rodríguez for a Mad Men series post, it isn’t easy to find English-language studies of the designer and his work. Vintage sewing enthusiasts will be aware of Rodríguez through his licensed sewing patterns, which were available from Advance, Spadea, and especially Vogue Patterns in the 1950s and 1960s (click to enlarge):

Pedro Rodriguez sewing patterns: Vogue 982, Vogue 1338, and Vogue 1412
Vogue patterns by Rodríguez. Images: VADS, Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Three short essays accompany the catalogue. Fashion historian Sílvia Rosés’ contribution, “Pedro Rodríguez: the Birth of a Fashion House and the Evolution of a Style,” gives readers an overview of Rodríguez’ 60-year career, with special attention to collections presented during the golden age of couture. Museum preservationist Sílvia Ventosa’s essay, “From the Wardrobe to the Museum: The Dresses of Maria Brillas in the Museu Tèxtil i d’Indumentària de Barcelona,” recounts the story of Brillas’ donation to the museum and its efforts in transferring her private wardrobe to a public, institutional context.

In “The Role of the Client in the Creation and Popularizing of New Trends,” Miren Arzalluz, who curated the 2011 exhibition, offers an intriguing perspective on the couturier-client relationship. Noting the long friendship between Maria Brillas and Pedro Rodríguez and the designer’s published observations on his clients’ role in the design process, she argues that “the relationship between designer and client was far richer, more complex and more fruitful than many people were willing to recognize” (67).

The book’s introductory material includes photographs of Pedro Rodríguez and models wearing his designs, but none of the client whose wardrobe the catalogue documents. Although an image gallery may be seen on the museum’s website, Brillas’ absence from the book feels like an oversight. In this photo taken in the 1950s, Maria Brillas dances with her husband at a formal event:

Photograph of Maria Brillas and Joachim Ensesa dancing - 1950s
Maria Brillas and Joachim Ensesa, 1950s. Image: Forum Para a Moda.

The catalogue proper is divided into eight sections organized by type; a brief summary introduces each section. There are five sections devoted to Rodríguez’ couture garments for Brillas: day dresses; suits and tailored ensembles; coats; cocktail or ceremonial dresses; and evening gowns. Here are some highlights:

Pedro Rodriguez day dresses for Maria Brillas: 1930s embroidered cotton tulle, 1950s printed silk taffeta, and 1960s canary-yellow double knit
Rodríguez day dresses. Left: cotton tulle with cotton embroidery, 1935; centre: printed silk taffeta, 1959; right: double wool knit, 1965.
Pedro Rodríguez coats for Maria Brillas: 1970s green wool with fox fur collar and 1950s lilac silk satin
Rodríguez coats; left: double-faced wool with dyed fox fur collar, 1972; right: silk satin, 1957.
Rodriguez coats for Maria Brillas: 1960s red waxed acetate raincoat and 1970s monkey-hair-trimmed black wool coat
Rodríguez coats. Left: raincoat in waxed acetate cloqué, 1965. Right: coat in double-faced wool with monkey-hair trim, 1974.
Three Pedro Rodríguez evening gowns for Maria Brillas: 1940s green silk with lace appliqués, 1970s beaded silk gauze and jet-embroidered black silk muslin
Rodríguez evening gowns. Left: silk crêpe georgette with silk lace appliqués, 1940-50; centre: silk gauze embroidered with glass and jet bugle beads, 1972-73; right: silk muslin embroidered with jet, 1973.
Pedro Rodríguez cream tulle and lace evening gown for Maria Brillas, circa 1950
Rodríguez mermaid dress in tulle and pleated cotton lace, ca. 1950.

Two sections are devoted to accessories, one for hats and the other for shoes, gloves, and bags. The hats are the earliest pieces in the catalogue, with many from the 1920s and 1930s. Some hats were produced at Rodríguez’ studio, while others were commissioned by him from prominent milliners. Brillas’ shoes were made to match her dresses.

Pedro Rodríguez printed silk satin cocktail dress for Maria Brillas with matching accessories for Maria, mid-1950s
Rodríguez cocktail dress with accessories. Dress: printed silk satin with rayon tufts; silk satin handbag and gloves; Bonet court shoes; all 1955-56.

The final section documents the collection’s miscellaneous other pieces: blouses, skirts, boleros, a bathrobe dress, a marabou-trimmed cape, and a fancy dress costume with mask headpiece:

Pedro Rodríguez fancy-dress hat and mask for Maria Brillas, 1968-70.
Rodríguez fancy dress hat and mask. Hat: nylon tulle with fil coupe brocade; mask: rayon satin with rhinestones, 1968-70.

It’s a beautifully produced volume, with high-quality photos presented in a reader-friendly smaller format. (You can see more photos at the website of Folch Studio, the design firm behind the book.) My only quibble is with the English text (I don’t read Spanish or Catalan), which contains infelicities that seem to be an effect of translation.

This book is a valuable addition to English-language resources on Rodríguez, and will assist in further study of the designer and his place in the history of haute couture.

* Paco was a member of the collection’s monitoring committee; you can read his post on the exhibition here.

Publication details:

Rossend Casanova (ed.), Pedro Rodríguez: Catàleg dels vestits de Maria Brillas / Catálogo de los vestidos de Maria Brillas / Catalogue of Maria Brillas’s Dresses, Barcelona: Museu Tèxtil i d’Indumentària de Barcelona, 2012.

Text in Catalan, Spanish, and English.

ISBN 978 84 9850 402 6

Available online from Laie, Barcelona.