Spring 2019 Designer Pattern Highlights

©Paco Peralta
Paco Peralta’s design drawing for V1619. Image courtesy Paco Peralta.

After 99 years on the newsstand, and just as stores are receiving the new designer patterns for Spring ’19, Vogue Patterns Magazine is ceasing publication.

VPM’s final issue — and the Spring release — sees the return of Thai-American model and photographer Piyawan Chitsamran, a.k.a. Piya Wan.

Piyawan Chitsamran photographed in V1614 by Tom and Linda Platt by Jack Deutsch for the final issue of Vogue Patterns Magazine
The final issue of Vogue Patterns Magazine, February/March 2019. Model: Piyawan Chitsamran. Photo: Jack Deutsch. Image: McCall’s.

The late, great Paco Peralta was promoting this pattern just days before his death. (See his design drawing at top of post.) As released, it includes the duster coat, shown in waxed polyester with a cotton poplin lining, and high-waisted gaucho pants. But as he told me, his submission also included the bias top.

Vogue 1619 by Paco Peralta (2019)
Vogue 1619 by Paco Peralta (2019) Image: McCall’s.

Zandra Rhodes is celebrating her label’s 50th anniversary in 2019. This jumpsuit with contrast binding is a Zandra Rhodes staple. The original is silk crepe de chine.

Vogue 1617 by Zandra Rhodes (2019)
Vogue 1617 by Zandra Rhodes (2019) Image: McCall’s.

The archival design, done in lipstick-print chiffon, was part of Rhodes’ second Archive collection for Matches Fashion.

Zandra Rhodes Archive II Lipstick jumpsuit in screen-printed silk chiffon. Image: Matches Fashion.

A silver version, for Fall 2018, was shot by Bridie O’Sullivan, the filmmaker / photographer behind Rhodes’ upcoming Jubilee documentary. (More at O’Sullivan’s website.)

Char Ellesse in Zandra Rhodes Party collection, Fall 2018
Zandra Rhodes Party collection, Fall 2018. Model: Charnah Ellesse. Photo: Bridie O’Sullivan. Image: Zandra Rhodes.

Badgley Mischka’s formal gown features a halter neckline with lace décolletage overlay.

Vogue 1615 by Badgley Mischka (2019)
Vogue 1615 by Badgley Mischka (2019) Image: McCall’s.

Add a beaded overbodice for a variation on the V1615 look.

Badgley Mischka’s gown with beaded tulle overbodice. Image: Badgley Mischka.

The striped dress on the back cover of the Spring lookbook is adapted from Carolina Herrera Resort ’18.

Vogue 9357 after Carolina Herrera, Vogue Patterns lookbook, Spring 2019. Image: Issuu.

The sleeveless midi dress is a Vogue Easy Options Custom Fit pattern, meaning it is adjustable for 4 cup sizes.

Vogue 9357 after Carolina Herrera (2019) Image: McCall’s.

The original is a linen-cotton denim that Vogue called “the standout material” of the collection’s casual pieces. As Nicole Phelps wrote, “Best of all was the sleeveless dress with contrast stitching, white buttons, and deep pockets.”

Carolina Herrera Resort 2018. Image: Vogue Runway.
Carolina Herrera Resort 2018
Carolina Herrera Resort 2018. Images: Moda Operandi.

Chop off the bodice for a tea-length skirt:

Carolina Herrera Resort 2018
Carolina Herrera Resort 2018. Image: Vogue Runway.

Another Vogue Easy Options design, the hi-low V9360 is Vogue’s adaptation of young London label Palmer Harding.

Vogue 9360 after Palmer Harding (2019) Image: McCall’s.

The Spring 2019 runway version — called the Streep — had dolman sleeves and a gathered back. Red latex gloves optional.

Palmer Harding Spring 2019. Photo: Luca Tombolini
Palmer Harding Spring 2019. Photo: Luca Tombolini. Image: Vogue Runway.

Add some asymmetry to the hemline and you have the Split and Super shirts:

Image: Palmer Harding.
Image: Palmer Harding.

Roland Mouret’s navy Barwick dress was worn by a certain duchess. Vogue shot its adaptation in Mouret’s trademark Peppermint, but the envelope shows the navy dress front and centre.

Vogue 9355 (2019) Adaptation of Roland Mouret's Barwick dress, worn by Meghan Markle V9355
Vogue 9355 (2019) Version of Roland Mouret’s Barwick dress. Image: McCall’s.

The Barwick dress, from Resort 2018, is still available from the designer website (link). The original is double wool crepe.

Barwick dress, Roland Mouret Resort 2018. Model: Shujing Zhou. Photo: Maria Ziegelböck
Barwick dress, Roland Mouret Resort 2018. Model: Shujing Zhou. Photo: Maria Ziegelböck. Image: Vogue Runway.

The same front neckline is seen in Roland Mouret’s Noblethorpe dress:

Noblethorpe dress, Roland Mouret Resort 2018. Model: Shujing Zhou. Photo: Maria Ziegelböck. Image: Vogue Runway.

For a more faithful copy, adjust the back neckline and add an exposed zipper.

Back view of Roland Mouret's Barwick dress
Back view of Roland Mouret’s Barwick dress. Image: Roland Mouret.

Finally, although Cynthia Rowley is absent from Simplicity’s Spring release, the company has reissued a late 1940s stole dress from the Simplicity Designer’s Pattern line.

1940s vintage reissue Simplicity 8876 (2019)
Simplicity 8876 (2019) Image: Simplicity.

The original fabric suggestions were: Silk, rayon or wool jersey; silk or rayon crepes; monotone or figured pure silk; taffeta; faille.

1940s stole dress pattern Simplicity Designer's Pattern 8108
Simplicity 8108 (1949) Image: Etsy.

Blade Runner, Fashion, and Sewing Patterns

Blade Runner-inspired Vogue Italia cover photographed by Steven Meisel, March 1998
Eugenia Silva wears Prada on the cover of Vogue Italia, March 1998. Photo: Steven Meisel. Editor: Bill Mullen. Image: The Fashion Spot.

Blade Runner 2049, Denis Villeneuve’s much-anticipated sequel to Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, opens today. Here’s a look at the fashion references and influence of the 1982 cult classic. (For Blade Runner’s influence on current fashion and an interview with costume designer Renée April, see Booth Moore, “‘Blade Runner 2049’ Already a Hit on the Fashion Runways.”)

Ryan Gosling in Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
Ryan Gosling in Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Image: Stephen Vaughan/Warner Bros.
Mugler Angel perfume ad, 2003
Thierry Mugler “Angel” fragrance advertisement, 2003. Image: eBay.

Blade Runner’s BAFTA-winning costume designers, Charles Knode and Michael Kaplan, cite 1940s film noir, with its iconic characters like Humphrey Bogart’s Sam Spade and Rita Hayworth’s Gilda, as their main inspiration. For the replicant Rachael, they also looked to the 1930s and ’40s tailoring of Hollywood costume designer-turned-couturier Adrian. (Kaplan is still in the genre-film spotlight with the new Star Wars trilogy, while the Adrian label—the subject of a recent exhibit—is being revived as Adrian Original.)

Rachael's fur coat and pieced suit - Blade Runner sketches by Michael Kaplan
Rachael costume sketches by Michael Kaplan for Blade Runner (1982). In Dressed: A Century of Hollywood Costume Design (Collins, 2007).

Kaplan used vintage fabrics for Rachael’s Adrian-inspired outfits: “I liked the idea of combining different shades of suiting fabrics to create patterns—something Adrian did. In this case I used amazing vintage suiting woollens in shades of grey and beige, with metallic threads that I was lucky enough to find, which created a subtle luminous quality.” (Source: AnOther mag.) This circa 1944 Butterick suit features Adrian-style piecing:

1940s colour-blocked suit pattern Retro Butterick 6286
Butterick 6286 from 1944 (2015)

In the 1980s, Claude Montana was the go-to designer for the decade’s updated triangular silhouette. (Ridley Scott has acknowledged the decade’s ’40s revival as an important factor in the film’s aesthetic.) This Vogue Individualist design plays up the ’40s influence:

1980s Claude Montana dress pattern - Vogue Individualist 1927
Vogue 1927 by Montana (1987)

In spring, 1997, Blade Runner: The Director’s Cut was one of the first movies to be released on DVD. The following spring, working with stylist Bill Mullen and set designer Jack Flanagan, Steven Meisel photographed a Blade Runner-homage cover and editorial for Vogue Italia’s March 1998 prêt-à-porter issue. Michael Kaplan recalls mistaking the cover for a film still. The editorial features text from Roy’s climactic monologue (“I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe…”) with clothes from Prada’s Spring 1998 collection, which paired natural materials with synthetics like latex and plexiglass.

Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion... Prada in Vogue Italia, March 1998
Prada Spring ’98 in Vogue Italia, March 1998. Photo: Steven Meisel. Editor: Bill Mullen. Image: Vogue Italia Archive.

Meanwhile, in Paris, Alexander McQueen referenced Blade Runner in his Fall/Winter 1998 ready-to-wear collection for Givenchy. Visionaire’s Alexander McQueen memorial issue includes an image from Steven Meisel’s fall advertising campaign. (For more on this collection, see my McQueen series post.)

Two looks from Alexander McQueen's for Givenchy Fall 1998 prêt-à-porter
Two looks from Alexander McQueen’s Fall 1998 prêt-à-porter collection for Givenchy. Images: firstVIEW, Corbis.
V2228 and V2248 on the runway - Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Fall 1998 prêt-à-porter
V2228 and V2248 (under jacket) on the runway – Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Fall 1998 prêt-à-porter. Images: Corbis.
Givenchy FW 1998 photographed by Steven Meisel in Visionaire 58: Spirit (2010)
Givenchy Fall 1998 by Alexander McQueen in Visionaire 58: Spirit (2010). Photo: Steven Meisel. Image: 1stdibs.

Sewists and Blade Runner devotees are fortunate to have two licensed patterns from this collection:

FW 1998 rtw fur-trimmed suit pattern by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Vogue 2228
Vogue 2228 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1998) Image: PatternVault shop.
FW 1998 rtw cowl-neck dress by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Vogue 2248
Vogue 2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1999) Image: PatternVault shop.

The sleeveless version of the dress seems to have been shown with a jacket on the runway. (Click the image to read about my version, which I wore to TIFF’s Cronenberg exhibit.)

In V2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy at BMC Labs / David Cronenberg: Evolution
In V2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy at David Cronenberg: Evolution, 2014.

Rachael’s chevron-quilted synthetic fur coat gets the most screen time, but it’s her blue brocade coat with standing fur collar that appears to have been McQueen’s main reference for the fur-trimmed coats and jackets. As the pattern reveals, the collar stands with the help of boning.

Rachael (Sean Young) in her quilted faux-fur coat in Blade Runner (1982)
Rachael (Sean Young) in her quilted faux-fur coat. Image: Vogue Italia.
Rachael's fur-trimmed blue brocade coat in Blade Runner (1982)
Rachael’s blue brocade coat. Images: Pinterest, Christies/BladeZone.
Charles Knode fur-trimmed coat sketches for Blade Runner
Charles Knode fur-trimmed coat sketches for Blade Runner. Image: BladeZone.
Blue leather coat with standing fur collar, Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Fall 1998 rtw
Blue leather coat with standing fur collar, Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Fall 1998 prêt-à-porter collection. Images: eBay.

(Wool version available here.)

The weathered tones and textures of Mayan Revival—prominently seen in Deckard’s apartment, as played by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House—form a thread linking the first film, Meisel’s Givenchy campaign, and Villeneuve’s sequel. It was Kaplan’s vision of a dirty retrofuture, rather than glossy futurism, that won him the Blade Runner gig. It will be interesting to see what role revivals play in the new film.

Rachael (Sean Young) visits Deckard's apartment in Blade Runner (1982)
Rachael (Sean Young) in Blade Runner (1982) Image: Restless Things.
Meisel campaign images for Alexander McQueen's Blade Runner collection for Givenchy, FW 1998
Givenchy Fall 1998 ad campaign featuring Alexander McQueen’s Blade Runner collection. Photos: Steven Meisel. Models: Erin O’Connor and Jade Parfitt.
K (Ryan Gosling) in Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049
K (Ryan Gosling) in Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Image: Vogue Italia.

For more production images for the new film, see the Vogue Italia gallery.