Phina Oruche

November 2, 2014 § 2 Comments

Phina Oruche in "Hush" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, season 4, episode 10)

Olivia Williams (Phina Oruche) in “Hush” (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, season 4)

“Hush,” one of the strongest and spookiest episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, stars a model-turned-actor who appeared on Vogue patterns in the mid-1990s. Giles’ girlfriend Olivia is played by Phina Oruche (b. 1972). Born in Toxteth, Liverpool to Nigerian parents, Oruche was a successful model in London and New York before she won her first role in Sydney Pollack’s remake of Sabrina (1995).

Phina Oruche on the cover of Essence magazine, September 1992

Phina Oruche on the cover of Essence magazine, September 1992. Image via Phina Oruche.

Here Oruche models Vogue 1328, Issey Miyake’s jacket, top, and hammer pants:

1990s Issey Miyake jacket, top and pants pattern - Vogue 1328

Vogue 1328 by Issey Miyake (1994) Image via Etsy.

Vogue 1344 is an ensemble consisting of a top, high-waisted pants, and jacket with custom closures from Anne Klein II:

1990s Anne Klein II pattern - Vogue 1344

Vogue 1344 by Anne Klein II (1994) Image via Etsy.

Here Oruche shows off the lace-up back of Vogue 1353, a summer dress by Betty Jackson:

Vogue 1353 (1994)

Vogue 1353 by Betty Jackson (1994) Image via Etsy.

Ornate trim highlights the seam detail on Vogue 1354, a top and skirt by Geoffrey Beene:

1990s Geoffrey Beene top and skirt pattern - Vogue 1354

Vogue 1354 by Geoffrey Beene (1994) Image via Etsy.

Just for fun, here’s a recent portrait of Oruche by Paul Jones:

Phina Oruche. Imaage via Paul Jones.

The Gentlemen are coming…

Phina Oruche in "Hush" (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, season 4, episode 10)

Phina Oruche in “Hush” (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, season 4)

Benedetta Barzini

September 1, 2014 § 2 Comments

Benedetta Barzini photographed by Peter Knapp for the cover of Vogue Italia, September 1967

Vogue Italia, September 1967. Photo: Peter Knapp. Image via NYMag.

In honour of Labour Day, this models post is devoted to iconic model and political activist Benedetta Barzini.

Benedetta Barzini (b. 1943) grew up in Porto Santo Stefano and New York City. She worked as a model in New York for four years after being discovered by Diana Vreeland. Here she appears on the cover of Vogue Italia’s inaugural issue:

Benedetta Barzini on the cover of Italian Vogue's inaugural issue, November 1965

Vogue Italia & Novita, November 1965. Photo: Giampaolo Barbieri. Image via Vogue Italia.

Although Barzini returned to Italy to act, in the early 1970s she left acting and modelling to pursue Marxist-feminist teaching and political activism. She returned to modelling in the late 1980s. As of 2013 Barzini was a Professor of Fashion and Anthropology at the Polytechnic Institute of Milan. (Recent interview here.)

Donna Karan spring 1999 campaign photographed by Peter Lindbergh.

Donna Karan spring 1999 campaign. Photo: Peter Lindbergh. Models: Benedetta Barzini and Annie Morton.

Gianni Penati photographed Barzini for a spring 1965 Vogue Patterns editorial for Vogue magazine. The patterns are Vogue 1429 by Christian Dior and Vogue 6534:

Benedetta Barzini wearing Vogue pattern 1429 by Christian Dior in Moygashel linen photographed by Gianni Penati

Vogue 1429 by Christian Dior. Vogue, March 15, 1965. Photo: Gianni Penati.

Benedetta Barzini wearing Vogue 6534 dress in Vogue, March 1965 photographed by Gianni Penati

Vogue 6534 in Vogue, March 15, 1965. Photo: Gianni Penati.

I have seen only one Vogue pattern with Barzini on the envelope. In 1967, Len Steckler photographed her in Vogue 1775 by Chuck Howard, a pattern from the new Vogue Americana line:

Astrid Heeren and Benedetta Barzini model Vogue 1783 (Chester Weinberg) and Vogue 1775 (Chuck Howard), Vogue Pattern Book fall 1967

New Vogue Americana patterns, Vogue Pattern Book, Autumn 1967. Photos: Len Steckler. Models: Astrid Heeren and Benedetta Barzini.

Barzini was also featured on the cover of the Vogue Patterns catalogue for August 1967:

Benedetta Barzini in Vogue 1775 by Chester Weinberg - Vogue Patterns catalogue August 1967

Vogue Patterns catalogue, August 1967. Image via Betsy Vintage.

Happy Labour Day, everyone!

Patterns in Vogue: Helmut Newton at the Beach

August 31, 2014 § 5 Comments

Vogue May 1964

Detail, Vogue, May 1, 1964. Photo: Helmut Newton.

In the mid-1960s, Helmut Newton photographed a two-page Vogue Patterns editorial for Vogue magazine on location at Wanda Beach, near Sydney, Australia.

The editorial features two pieces from a single beachwear pattern: Vogue 6211. The cowl-neck coverup is shown in white terry cloth, the one-piece drawstring bathing suit in double-knit Orlon; the linen hats are by Adolfo and Halston (click to enlarge):

Vogue 6211 coverup and bathing suit photographed by Helmut Newton - Vogue 1 May 1964

Vogue 6211 in Vogue, May 1, 1964. Photos: Helmut Newton.

As always, back views and yardage could be found in the back of the magazine:

Vogue 1May1964 219

Vogue, May 1, 1964.

Click the Patterns in Vogue tag for more posts in the series.

Vintage Jumpsuit Patterns

July 25, 2014 § 10 Comments

1970s jumpsuit or playsuit pattern - Vogue 8331

Vogue 8331 (1972) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Versatile and contemporary, jumpsuits and their cousins, playsuits and rompers, have become increasingly popular in the last few years. Jumpsuits—or all-in-ones, if you’re British—seem poised to move beyond a trend this summer.

The modern women’s jumpsuit has origins in two different garments: beach pajamas and the boiler suit. These twin origins mean jumpsuit styles range from fluid loungewear to utility-inspired or tailored designs. (See Vogue Italia for a short history of the jumpsuit.) Here are some favourite all-in-one patterns from the 1930s to the 1990s.

1930s–1940s

Beach pajamas, often worn with a matching bolero, had become one-piece by the early 1930s. This McCall’s design combines flowing trousers with geometric seaming details in the bodice and hip yoke. A reproduction is available from the Model A Ford Club of America:

1930s beach pajama pattern - McCall 6432

McCall 6432 (1931) Image via the Model A Ford Club of America.

(See my earlier beachwear post here; for more on beach pajamas, see the FIDM Museum blog and Amber Butchart’s essay for British Pathé.)

The boiler suits of wartime utility wear are said to have made bifurcated clothing more acceptable for women. This Vogue pattern from ca. 1940 includes both a hooded mechanic suit with cuffed trousers and a more casual, short-sleeved version shown in a dotted print:

1940s Rosie the Riveter all-in-one hooded boiler suit pattern - Vogue 8852

Vogue 8852 (1940) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

This early 1940s pajama ensemble with T-back halter bodice was not just for the beach—the envelope says it’s for “beach, dinner or evening”:

1940s pajama ensemble pattern - McCall 4075

McCall 4075 (1941) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

1950s

In the postwar period, more tailored jumpsuits emerged as a choice for casual sportswear. This early 1950s pedal-pusher coverall has cuffed sleeves and pants and a front zipper closure:

1950s pedal-pusher coverall pattern - McCall's 8520

McCall’s 8520 (1951) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

From the late 1950s, this trim, one-piece slack suit from Vogue came in two lengths and with a matching overskirt:

1950s jumpsuit and skirt pattern - Vogue 9898

Vogue 9898 (1959) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

1960s

The jumpsuit—sometimes called a culotte or pantdress—truly comes into its own in the later 1960s. Here Birgitta af Klercker models Vogue 2249, a loungewear design by Emilio Pucci (previously featured in my goddess gown post):

1960s Pucci lounge pajamas pattern - Vogue 2249

Vogue 2249 by Pucci (1969) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

In this late 1960s Butterick Young Designers pattern, Mary Quant combines a trim, zip-front jumpsuit with a low-waisted miniskirt for a sleek, futuristic look:

1960s jumpsuit pattern by Mary Quant - Butterick 5404

Butterick 5404 by Mary Quant (1969) Image via Etsy.

1970s

Both pajama and menswear-inspired styles continue into the 1970s. Famous for her palazzo pajamas, Galitzine designed this bi-coloured lounge pantdress with criss-cross halter bodice:

1970s Galitzine lounge pantdress pattern - Vogue 2731

Vogue 2731 by Galitzine (1972) Image via the Blue Gardenia.

From Calvin Klein, Vogue 1453 marks a return to the boiler suit style. With cargo pockets, self belt, and wide, notched collar, the jumpsuit could be made long or short, with long or short sleeves:

1970s Calvin Klein jumpsuit pattern - Vogue 1453

Vogue 1453 by Calvin Klein (1976) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

1980s

This Bob Mackie disco jumpsuit or evening dress pattern for stretch knits dates to 1980. (See my earlier Bob Mackie post here.) The jumpsuit has a plunging neckline, waistline pleats, and tapered, bias pants designed to crush at the ankles:

McCall's 7134 1980s Bob Mackie disco jumpsuit or evening dress pattern

McCall’s 7134 by Bob Mackie (1980)

An instance of the late 1980s jumpsuit trend, this shirtdress-style jumpsuit by Donna Karan has a notched collar, welt pockets, and cuffed or seven-eighths length kimono sleeves:

1980s Donna Karan jumpsuit pattern - Vogue 2284

Vogue 2284 by Donna Karan (1989) Image via eBay.

1990s

Also by Donna Karan, Vogue 2609, ca. 1990, is a long-sleeved, tapered jumpsuit for stretch knits with neckline variations, front pleats, and stirrups. View C has a contrast bodice with self-lined hood:

1990s Donna Karan jumpsuit pattern - Vogue 2609

Vogue 2609 by Donna Karan (1990) Image via the Blue Gardenia.

From 1996, Vogue 1821 by DKNY is almost vintage. It’s a novel suit consisting of a single-breasted jacket and wide-legged, halter jumpsuit:

1990s DKNY jumpsuit pattern - Vogue 1821

Vogue 1821 by DKNY (1996) Image via eBay.

Finally, this pattern is not yet vintage, but a jumpsuit collection would be incomplete without Vogue 2343, Alexander McQueen’s tailored, tuxedo jumpsuit for Givenchy haute couture Spring/Summer 1998 (earlier post here):

1990s Alexander McQueen for Givenchy couture jumpsuit pattern - Vogue 2343

Vogue 2343 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1999) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

With their demanding fit, jumpsuits are ideal for home sewers. And they’re not just for the tall and leggy: many of the later jumpsuit patterns are marked as suitable for petites.

If you’d like to try your hand at an early all-in-one, Wearing History has a repro pattern for 1930s beach pajamas, and Simplicity 9978 includes a 1940s boiler suit.

Third Blogiversary + Giveaway

July 11, 2014 § 36 Comments

1930s Vogue Patterns booklet, December 15, 1931

Vogue Patterns booklet, December 15, 1931. Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

Today marks three years since my first post on this blog. To celebrate my blogiversary I’m throwing a giveaway: one lucky reader will win 5 instant downloads from the PatternVault Etsy shop.

1930s T. Eaton Co. Paris and Style Patterns booklet showing Augustabernard pattern 2311

Paris and Style Patterns booklet, June 1934. Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

To enter, leave a comment mentioning what you’d like to see more of on the blog. The giveaway closes Monday, July 14th at midnight EDT. The winner will be chosen at random and announced this Tuesday, July 15th.

Linda Evangelista

July 1, 2014 § Leave a comment

Linda Evangelista photographed by Steven Meisel for the cover of Vogue Italia February 1990

Vogue Italia, February 1990. Photo: Steven Meisel. Image via Bellazon.

In celebration of Canada Day, this models post is devoted to Canadian supermodel Linda Evangelista.

Born in St. Catharines, Ontario to Italian-Canadian parents, Linda Evangelista (b. 1965) was discovered by a scout from Elite at the 1981 Miss Teen Niagara beauty contest. (She didn’t win.) At eighteen she signed with Elite and moved to New York and later, Paris. Evangelista became one of the world’s most successful and influential models, especially after Julien d’Ys cut her hair short in 1988. (More on Voguepedia.)

Linda Evangelista photographed by Patrick Demarchelier for the cover of Harper's Bazaar, March 1997

Harper’s Bazaar, March 1997. Photo: Patrick Demarchelier. Image via Top Models of the World.

Some of Evangelista’s early work can be seen in 1980s Vogue patterns and Burda magazine.

1980s

The young Evangelista made the cover of the Spring/Summer 1985 issue of Burda international:

Linda Evangelista on the cover of Burda international magazine, Frühling-Sommer 1985

Burda international, Spring/Summer 1985. Image via flickr.

She also starred in a jazz club-themed Burda editorial shot by Günter Feuerbacher (click the image for more):

1980s Linda Evangelista editorial in Burda international, Frühling/Sommer 1985

Linda Evangelista in Burda international, Spring/Summer 1985. Photo: Günter Feuerbacher. Image via Magdorable!

Evangelista’s work with Vogue Patterns was for the Paris Originals line. Here she models a popular, pleated wrap dress by Emanuel Ungaro, Vogue 1799:

1980s Emanuel Ungaro dress pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1799

Vogue 1799 by Emanuel Ungaro (1986) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Evangelista can be seen on a number of Yves Saint Laurent patterns. Vogue 1720 is an elegant dress with blouson bodice and wide, bias roll collar. The pattern includes the contrast sash:

1980s Yves Saint Laurent dress pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1720

Vogue 1720 by Yves Saint Laurent (1986) Image via Paco Peralta.

Here Evangelista shows off advanced-class colour blocking in Vogue 1721, a Nina Ricci pattern for a dramatic hooded blouse, mock-wrap skirt, sleeveless top, and sash:

1980s Nina Ricci evening pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1721

Vogue 1721 by Nina Ricci (1986) Image via Etsy.

This editorial photo from the Autumn 1986 issue of Vogue Patterns magazine best conveys the different colours:

Linda Evangelista wears Vogue 1721 by Nina Ricci, Vogue Patterns, Autumn 1986. Image via Magdorable!

Evangelista also appeared on the cover of the July/August 1987 issue of Vogue Patterns:

Linda Evangelista on the cover of Vogue Patterns magazine, summer 1987

Vogue Patterns, July/August 1987. Image via tumblr.

1990s

In the mid-1990s, Evangelista’s runway work for Yves Saint Laurent reached home sewers on Vogue pattern envelopes. From the YSL Rive Gauche Spring 1996 collection, Vogue 1862 is a pattern for cropped jacket, blouse, and high-waisted pants (see a detail shot on firstVIEW):

Vogue 1862 by Yves Saint Laurent (1996). Image via Etsy.

Evangelista brings out the drama of this Yves Saint Laurent Cossack-style coat, Vogue 1652:

1990s Yves Saint Laurent coat pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1652

Vogue 1652 by Yves Saint Laurent (1995) Image via Paco Peralta.

Happy Canada Day, everyone!

Vintage Designer Menswear: Vogue Patterns

June 15, 2014 § 5 Comments

1970s Bill Blass men's jacket, sweater, shirt and necktie pattern - Vogue 2917

Vogue 2917 by Bill Blass (1973) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

It’s been some time since Vogue offered designer menswear patterns. In the 1970s and 1980s, home sewers could choose from licensed designs for everything from men’s shirts to outerwear and three-piece suits. In celebration of Father’s Day, here’s a selection of vintage menswear patterns from Vogue Patterns.

1970s

Vogue introduced designer menswear patterns in the early 1970s with designs by Bill Blass and Pierre Cardin. From Cardin, Vogue 2918 is a double-breasted coat in two lengths:

1970s Pierre Cardin men's coat pattern - Vogue 2918

Vogue 2918 by Pierre Cardin (1973) Image via Etsy.

1975 saw the release of some his-and-hers Valentino patterns. Vogue 1180, a men’s jacket and pants pattern, was photographed with a women’s Valentino ensemble, Vogue 1178:

1970s Valentino men's jacket and pants pattern - Vogue 1180

Vogue 1180 by Valentino (1975) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Polo by Ralph Lauren was introduced to Vogue customers in the summer of 1975. The safari-style Vogue 1237 and 1238 were photographed in India:

Polo Ralph Lauren men's patterns in Vogue Patterns May June 1975

Vogue 1237 and 1238 by Polo Ralph Lauren in Vogue Patterns, May/June 1975. Photos: Steve Horn. Image via Make Mine Vogue.

Also by Polo Ralph Lauren, Vogue 1581 is a double-breasted trench coat with detachable lining:

1970s Polo Ralph Lauren men's trench coat pattern - Vogue 1581

Vogue 1581 by Polo by Ralph Lauren (c. 1977) Image via Art Fashion Creation.

This Christian Dior shirt-jacket and pants is the only men’s Dior pattern I’ve seen:

1970s Christian Dior men's shirt-jacket and pants pattern - Vogue 1609

Vogue 1609 by Christian Dior (c. 1977) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

This snappy three-piece suit is by Bill Blass:

1970s Bill Blass men's 3-piece suit pattern - Vogue 1620

Vogue 1620 by Bill Blass (1977) Image via patronescostura on Etsy.

There were two menswear patterns by Yves Saint Laurent: safari suits photographed by Chris von Wangenheim (see Paco’s related post here):

Yves Saint Laurent men's patterns in Vogue Patterns March April 1977

Vogue 1645 and 1644 by Yves Saint Laurent in Vogue Patterns, March/April 1977. Photos: Chris von Wangenheim. Image via Paco Peralta.

Givenchy licensed a trim three-piece suit, Vogue 2112:

1970s Givenchy menswear pattern - Vogue 2112

Vogue 2112 by Givenchy (1979) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

In 1979 the company released a trio of menswear patterns by Calvin Klein—separate patterns for a shirt, jacket, and pants. Vogue 2256 is a pattern for slim, tapered men’s pants; view B is low-rise and flat-front:

1970s Calvin Klein men's trousers pattern - Vogue 2256

Vogue 2256 by Calvin Klein (1979) Image via Etsy.

1980s

The menswear releases tapered off in the 1980s. 1980 saw the release of two Bill Blass men’s patterns, for a three-piece suit and close-fitting shirt:

1980s Bill Blass men's shirt pattern - Vogue 2586

Vogue 2586 by Bill Blass (1980) Image via Etsy.

In 1988 Vogue released three menswear patterns by Perry Ellis, for a jacket, shirt, and pants. Vogue 2207 is a loose-fitting jacket:

1980s Perry Ellis men's jacket pattern - Vogue 2207

Vogue 2207 by Perry Ellis (1988) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Just for fun, I’ll close with this Pierre Cardin robe and pajamas, which included a logo appliqué:

1970s Pierre Cardin men's pajamas and robe pattern - Vogue 2798 - moustachioed man on telephone

Vogue 2798 by Pierre Cardin (c. 1972) Image via Etsy.

With menswear sales catching up with womenswear, perhaps Vogue Patterns will capitalize on this trend by restoring menswear to its designer licensing. I’d be first in line for a Saint Laurent pattern…

Happy Father’s Day!

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