Yves Saint Laurent for Dior: Vogue Patterns

December 17, 2014 § 5 Comments

Isabella Albonico photographed by Leombruno-Bodi in Dior pattern 1471 for Vogue, January 1st, 1960

Detail of Vogue 1471 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior, Vogue, January 1, 1960. Photo: Leombruno-Bodi.

For Paco Peralta.

Before Vogue Patterns introduced Yves Saint Laurent with patterns from the Mondrian collection, the company had already licensed the designer’s work for the house of Dior. (Read more at the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, or see Dustin’s post here.)

Yves Saint Laurent was appointed head designer at Dior after Christian Dior’s death in 1957. Dior had been his mentor; in 1955 he hired Saint Laurent to work at his new boutique, later promoting him to accessories and couture. Richard Avedon’s famous Dovima with Elephants shows a velvet evening dress designed by Yves Saint Laurent while he was still assistant designer:

Avedon's Dovima with Elephants and YSL sketch for Dior, 1955

Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris, 1955, and sketch by Yves Saint Laurent.

(Images via Enticing the Light and Encore! Life.)

Saint Laurent’s first collection for Dior, Trapèze (Spring 1958 haute couture), was a huge success, and his later work at the house continued its play with proportion. L’Officiel’s spring preview issue for 1958 featured an illustration of a Dior trapeze dress by René Gruau:

L'Officiel mars 1958: Gruau illustration of a black Dior trapeze dress

Christian Dior trapeze dress on the cover of L’Officiel, March 1958. Illustration: René Gruau. Image via jalougallery.com.

The young Yves Saint Laurent designed six haute couture collections for Dior; Vogue’s licensing represents his last three collections for the house, from 1959 to 1960.

Christian Dior label, fall-winter 1959 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Christian Dior label, automne-hiver 1959. Image via the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

1. Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall/Winter 1959

Saint Laurent’s second Fall/Winter couture collection for Dior was controversial; L’Officiel declared its aesthetic “femininity pushed to the extreme.” Suits were shown with severely cropped jackets, and the skirt silhouettes included voluminous tiers and hobble skirts.

The first Dior patterns were promoted with illustrations by Esther Larson in the late 1959 issues of Vogue Pattern Book and Vogue Printed Pattern News (thanks to the White Cabinet for the ID):

Vogue 1472 on the cover of Vogue Pattern news for December 15th, 1959

Vogue Printed Pattern News, December 15, 1959. Illustration: Esther Larson.

Anticipating demand for this high-profile addition to Vogue’s designer patterns, Vogue Pattern Book noted that the new patterns would be available in stores after November 10th:

Dior patterns in Vogue Pattern Book, December 1959-January 1960. Illustrations: Esther Larson. Image via Make Mine Vogue.

The first Dior patterns were photographed by Joseph Leombruno and Jack Bodi, the couple who worked as Leombruno-Bodi. In Vogue magazine’s first issue for 1960, Isabella Albonico modelled the two dress ensembles, Vogue 1471 and 1470:

For the first time Vogue patterns from designs by Dior. Vogue 1 Jan 1960

Vogue patterns from designs by Dior, Vogue, January 1, 1960. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi.

Leombruno-Bodi also photographed the new Dior patterns for Ladies’ Home Journal. The accompanying text for Vogue 1470 suggests that the hobble skirt silhouette was considered extreme: “Dior’s famous ‘hobble’ skirt makes a charming mid-season costume … The pattern also includes details on how to make the dress without the band at the bottom of the skirt for less extreme effect.” The model on the left is Anne St. Marie (click to enlarge):

Nora O'Leary, "Christian Dior: Yours for the Making," with hats by Vincent-Harmik, Maria Pia, and John Frederics - Ladies' Home Journal Jan 1960

Nora O’Leary, “Christian Dior: Yours for the Making,” Ladies’ Home Journal, January 1960. Photos: Leombruno-Bodi. Image via the Internet Archive.

Vogue 1470 is a striking dress and jacket ensemble. The short jacket has three-quarter sleeves and bow trim at the waist, while the dress has short sleeves, low V-neckline, and the collection’s distinctive pouf-hobble skirt banded at the knee. The original was navy tweed:

1950s Christian Dior dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1470

Vogue 1470 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Dress and jacket.

Here’s the envelope description: One piece dress and jacket. Skirt, with or without puffed tunic, joins the bodice at the waistline. Wide V neck-line with band finish. Short kimono sleeves. Short fitted jacket, joined to waistband, has concealed fastening below notched collar; below elbow length sleeves. Novelty belt.

Vogue 1471 is a close-fitting, double-breasted jacket with matching dress. The original was black-and-white tweed:

1950s Christian Dior dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1471

Vogue 1471 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Image via Make Mine Vogue.

The envelope description reads: One piece dress and jacket. Flared skirt joins the bodice at the waist-line. Single button closing below the wide V neck-line with extension band finish. Above elbow length and short sleeves. Double breasted jacket has notched collar and below elbow length sleeves. Novelty belt for version A.

Vogue 1472 seems to have been the most popular of the three patterns. The voluminous coat and skirt suit were modelled by Nena von Schlebrügge:

1950s Christian Dior coat and suit pattern - Vogue 1472

Vogue 1472 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Here’s the envelope description: Coat, suit and scarf. Double-breasted hip length jacket has a notched collar and below elbow length sleeves with buttoned vents. Slim skirt. Double-breasted, full coat in two lengths has a large shaped collar. Concealed pocket in side seams. Below elbow length sleeves joined to dropped shoulder armholes. Straight scarf.

In the next issue of Vogue Pattern Book, the Vogue 1472 coat is called “the newsmaking original Dior coat that tops the suit… Note the extras here: the enormous buttons, the slashed side seams, the stitched collar, the scarf to match. Your own extra: a towering cloche of the checked fabric”:

Photo of Nena von Schlebrügge in Vogue 1472 in Vogue Pattern Book Feb/Mar 1960

Vogue 1472 in Vogue Pattern Book, February/March 1960. Image via eBay.

2. Christian Dior Haute Couture Spring/Summer 1960

Saint Laurent’s Spring 1960 collection for Dior was characterized by rounded silhouettes and vibrant colour. L’Officiel noted its straight suits with jackets cut on the bias to achieve the suppleness of a knitted cardigan.

Vogue 1012, introduced in the August/September 1960 issue of Vogue Pattern Book, includes a collarless, single-breasted skirt suit and sleeveless blouse with crisscross back. The jacket in view A is cut on the bias:

1960s Christian Dior suit and blouse pattern - Vogue 1012

Vogue 1012 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1960) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

The envelope description reads: Suit and blouse. Short, straight jacket buttons below collarless away from normal neck-line. Welt pockets. Below elbow length kimono sleeves. Skirt has soft gathers from very shallow yoke. Easy fitting overblouse has shoulder straps crisscrossed at back.

This suit is similar to Vogue 1012, but has a more conventional button front:

L'Officiel 457-58 Dior

Christian Dior’s pared-down suit, L’Officiel, April 1960. Photo: Philippe Pottier. Image via jalougallery.com.

These Guy Arsac editorial photos of a red “boule” coat and teal dress show the collection’s play with colour and silhouette:

L'Officiel 455-56 Dior Arsac

“Boule” coat by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, March 1960. Photo: Guy Arsac. Image via jalougallery.com.

LOfficiel 457-58 Diorb

Silk dress by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, April 1960. Photo: Guy Arsac. Image via jalougallery.com.

3. Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall/Winter 1960

Yves Saint Laurent’s controversial final collection for Dior, le Beat look, was inspired by Left Bank icon Juliette Gréco and the Beatniks of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. It was innovative for its infusion of youthful, bohemian street style into the couture, with Beat elements including leather jackets, knitted turtlenecks, and plenty of black.

Vogue produced two patterns from this collection, drawn from the more conventional designs. Vogue 1041 is a skirt suit and matching, loose coat with a big standing collar and side slits:

1960s Christian Dior suit and coat pattern - Vogue 1041

Vogue 1041 by Christian Dior (1960) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Here’s the envelope description: Suit and coat. Easy fitting jacket has high buttoned closing below neck-band. Vent opening in side front seams. Bracelet length and elbow length sleeves. Slightly gathered skirt has outside stitched front panel concealing pockets. Seven eighths length loose coat has opening in side seams. Away-from-neck-line standing neck-band. Bracelet length kimono sleeves.

Philippe Pottier photographed the purple coat ensemble for L’Officiel‘s winter collections issue:

Christian Dior tweed ensemble photographed by Philippe Pottier for L'Officiel octobre 1960

Christian Dior tweed ensemble, L’Officiel, October 1960. Photo: Philippe Pottier. Image via jalougallery.com

Vogue 1041 was photographed for Vogue magazine by Henry Clarke:

Vogue 1041 by Dior photographed by Henry Clarke - Vogue Nov 15th, 1960

Vogue 1041 in Vogue, November 15, 1960. Photo: Henry Clarke.

Vogue 1041 by Dior photographed by Henry Clarke - Vogue Nov 15th, 1960

Vogue 1041 in Vogue, November 15, 1960. Photo: Henry Clarke.

Vogue 1049 is a skirt suit and sleeveless overblouse. The blouse is worn over a barrel skirt with attached underbodice for a dropped-waist effect. The jacket of view A is designed to be worn open:

1960s Christian Dior suit pattern - Vogue 1049

Vogue 1049 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1961) Image via Etsy.

The envelope description reads: Suit and blouse. Box jacket has cut away fronts and simulated buttoned closing or complete buttoned closing, below standing band collar. Easy fitting overblouse with optional tied belt has bateau neck-line. Above elbow length sleeves and sleeveless. Slightly barrelled shaped skirt attached to bodice.

The dotted black ensemble in duchesse velvet was photographed for this Chatillon Mouly Roussel advertisement in L’Officiel:

Ensemble de Christian Dior en duchesse velours de Chatillon Mouly Roussel

Chatillon Mouly Roussel ad showing an ensemble by Christian Dior, L’Officiel, October 1960. Image via jalougallery.com.

I also found the black suit in a later L’Officiel composite:

A Dior suit by Yves Saint Laurent - Dior 1000modèles Beat

A Dior suit by Yves Saint Laurent, L’Officiel 1000 modèles no. 81 (2007). Image via jalougallery.com.

These William Klein editorial photos featuring Dior Fall 1960 designs capture the Beat collection’s youthful spirit:

Dorothea McGowan and Sara Thom in Dior, with Little Bara, photographed for Vogue by WIlliam Klein

Dorothea McGowan and Sara Thom in Dior, with Little Bara. Vogue, September 1960. William Klein. Image via Pleasurephoto.

Dorothea McGowan in Dior, with Little Bara, photographed for Vogue by WIlliam Klein

Dorothea McGowan in Christian Dior. Vogue, September 1960. Photo: William Klein. Image via the Fashion Spot.

For more of Yves Saint Laurent’s work for Dior see L’Officiel 1000 modèles’ Dior special issue.

Benedetta Barzini

September 1, 2014 § 2 Comments

Benedetta Barzini photographed by Peter Knapp for the cover of Vogue Italia, September 1967

Vogue Italia, September 1967. Photo: Peter Knapp. Image via NYMag.

In honour of Labour Day, this models post is devoted to iconic model and political activist Benedetta Barzini.

Benedetta Barzini (b. 1943) grew up in Porto Santo Stefano and New York City. She worked as a model in New York for four years after being discovered by Diana Vreeland. Here she appears on the cover of Vogue Italia’s inaugural issue:

Benedetta Barzini on the cover of Italian Vogue's inaugural issue, November 1965

Vogue Italia & Novita, November 1965. Photo: Giampaolo Barbieri. Image via Vogue Italia.

Although Barzini returned to Italy to act, in the early 1970s she left acting and modelling to pursue Marxist-feminist teaching and political activism. She returned to modelling in the late 1980s. As of 2013 Barzini was a Professor of Fashion and Anthropology at the Polytechnic Institute of Milan. (Recent interview here.)

Donna Karan spring 1999 campaign photographed by Peter Lindbergh.

Donna Karan spring 1999 campaign. Photo: Peter Lindbergh. Models: Benedetta Barzini and Annie Morton.

Gianni Penati photographed Barzini for a spring 1965 Vogue Patterns editorial for Vogue magazine. The patterns are Vogue 1429 by Christian Dior and Vogue 6534:

Benedetta Barzini wearing Vogue pattern 1429 by Christian Dior in Moygashel linen photographed by Gianni Penati

Vogue 1429 by Christian Dior. Vogue, March 15, 1965. Photo: Gianni Penati.

Benedetta Barzini wearing Vogue 6534 dress in Vogue, March 1965 photographed by Gianni Penati

Vogue 6534 in Vogue, March 15, 1965. Photo: Gianni Penati.

I have seen only one Vogue pattern with Barzini on the envelope. In 1967, Len Steckler photographed her in Vogue 1775 by Chuck Howard, a pattern from the new Vogue Americana line:

Astrid Heeren and Benedetta Barzini model Vogue 1783 (Chester Weinberg) and Vogue 1775 (Chuck Howard), Vogue Pattern Book fall 1967

New Vogue Americana patterns, Vogue Pattern Book, Autumn 1967. Photos: Len Steckler. Models: Astrid Heeren and Benedetta Barzini.

Barzini was also featured on the cover of the Vogue Patterns catalogue for August 1967:

Benedetta Barzini in Vogue 1775 by Chester Weinberg - Vogue Patterns catalogue August 1967

Vogue Patterns catalogue, August 1967. Image via Betsy Vintage.

Happy Labour Day, everyone!

Patterns in Vogue: Helmut Newton at the Beach

August 31, 2014 § 5 Comments

Vogue May 1964

Detail, Vogue, May 1, 1964. Photo: Helmut Newton.

In the mid-1960s, Helmut Newton photographed a two-page Vogue Patterns editorial for Vogue magazine on location at Wanda Beach, near Sydney, Australia.

The editorial features two pieces from a single beachwear pattern: Vogue 6211. The cowl-neck coverup is shown in white terry cloth, the one-piece drawstring bathing suit in double-knit Orlon; the linen hats are by Adolfo and Halston (click to enlarge):

Vogue 6211 coverup and bathing suit photographed by Helmut Newton - Vogue 1 May 1964

Vogue 6211 in Vogue, May 1, 1964. Photos: Helmut Newton.

As always, back views and yardage could be found in the back of the magazine:

Vogue 1May1964 219

Vogue, May 1, 1964.

Click the Patterns in Vogue tag for more posts in the series.

Nena von Schlebrügge and Uma Thurman

May 12, 2014 § 6 Comments

Autumn 1960 Vogue Pattern Book (UK edition)

Nena von Schlebrügge on the cover of Vogue Pattern Book, Autumn 1960. Image via eBay.

(A late Mother’s Day post since I was under the weather yesterday.)

In honour of Mother’s Day, this models post is devoted to a mother and daughter who both modelled for designer sewing patterns: Nena von Schlebrügge and Uma Thurman.

Nena von Schlebrügge (b. 1941) was born in Mexico City to German-Swedish parents who had fled Nazi Germany. In 1957, two years after she was discovered by Norman Parkinson, she moved from her native Stockholm to London to pursue modelling, later moving to New York to sign with Eileen Ford.

Norman Parkinson test shot of Nena von Schlebrügge, Stockholm, 1955

Nena von Schlebrügge, first test shots, Stockholm, 1955. Photo: Norman Parkinson. Image via artnet.

Nena von Schlebrügge appears on a number of Vogue Pattern Book covers and Vogue patterns from the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Here she models one of Vogue’s first Dior patterns by Yves Saint Laurent—Vogue 1472, a skirt suit and full coat with big, shaped collar:

1950s Christian Dior coat and suit pattern featuring Nena von Schlebrügge - Vogue 1472

Vogue 1472 by Yves Saint Laurent for Christian Dior (1959). Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Von Schlebrügge can also be seen on Vogue 1484 by Madame Grès, a 3-piece ensemble that includes a voluminous coat with three-quarter sleeves, loose back panel, and elegant contrast lapels and lining:

Vogue 1484 by Grès (1960) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Nena von Schlebrügge on a 1960 Grès pattern - Vogue 1484

Detail of Vogue 1484 by Grès (1960) Image via Etsy.

Uma Thurman (b. 1970) is the daughter of Nena von Schlebrügge and her second husband, Robert Thurman. Born and raised in Massachusetts, Uma Thurman dropped out of her prep school there to pursue acting in New York City, where she worked as a fashion model before landing her breakout roles in Stephen Frears’ Dangerous Liaisons (1988) and Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988).

Patrick Demarchelier photo of Uma Thurman on the cover of British Vogue, December 1985

British Vogue, December 1985. Photo: Patrick Demarchelier. Image via Vogue UK.

Uma Thurman is featured on a handful of 1980s Simplicity patterns, including two by Cathy Hardwick. (These may date to Tom Ford’s time at the company.)

Here Thurman wears Simplicity 8054, a wrap dress with halter back and capelet sleeves, in classic red:

1980s Cathy Hardwick dress pattern featuring Uma Thurman - Simplicity 8054

Simplicity 8054 by Cathy Hardwick (1986) Image via Etsy.

Here she models a pure ’80s LBD with big shoulders and flutter sleeves, Simplicity 8055:

1980s Cathy Hardwick dress pattern featuring Uma Thurman - Simplicity 8055

Simplicity 8055 by Cathy Hardwick (1987) Image via Etsy.

Nena von Schlebrügge later became a psychotherapist and director of Tibet House and the Menla Center; Uma Thurman is an Academy Award nominee for her role in Pulp Fiction (1994). Thurman’s presence is already evident in her Simplicity patterns. Isn’t the family resemblance striking?

Mad Men Era 9: Butterick’s Young Designers

April 24, 2014 § 2 Comments

Megan Draper (Jessica Paré) in a Mad Men season 7 promotional photo. Image via AMC.

My series on Mad Men-era designer patterns concludes this week with three Butterick Young Designers: Mary Quant, Jean Muir, and Emmanuelle Khanh.

In 1964, Butterick launched its Young Designers line, appealing to the youth market by licensing the work of up-and-coming, international fashion designers. The line would continue through the 1970s with the addition of new designers like Betsey Johnson, Jane Tise, and Kenzo. (For more on the Young Designers line see The Vintage Traveler’s Butterick Young Designers page.)

Mary Quant

Mary Quant (b. 1934) was the first designer to be signed to the new pattern line. Born in London, Quant met Archie McNair and her future husband, Alexander Plunket Greene, at art school; together they opened a boutique on the King’s Road, Bazaar, in 1955, selling Quant’s fun, youthful designs. Quant is perhaps most famous as a pioneer of the miniskirt. Butterick released its first Quant patterns, featuring Celia Hammond photographed by Terence Donovan, in the fall of 1964.

Butterick 5475 is a mini-length shirt dress with plenty of details including epaulets, side slits, and a self-buttoned belt:

1960s Mary Quant mini dress pattern - Butterick 5475

Butterick 5475 by Mary Quant (1969) Mini dress.

Jean Muir

Also born in London, Jean Muir (1928-1995) showed an early talent for dressmaking and needlework. During the 1950s, after working her way up from the stockroom at Liberty, she was hired as designer for Jaeger; she stayed with Jaeger until 1962, when she founded her first label, Jane & Jane. She launched her eponymous label in 1966. Muir was known for her fluid dresses with charming dressmaker details.

Butterick introduced Jean Muir patterns in the spring of 1965. This short, high-waisted dress dates to the late 1960s; the bodice front and slashed, modified raglan bell sleeves fasten with rows of tiny buttons:

1960s Jean Muir dress pattern - Butterick 5657

Butterick 5657 by Jean Muir (c. 1969) Image via eBay.

Emmanuelle Khanh

Born in Paris as Renée Mésière, Emmanuelle Khanh (b. 1937) married avant-garde industrial designer Quasar Khanh in the late 1950s, around the same time that she began working as a house model for Balenciaga and Givenchy. Turning her hand to fashion design, Khanh was soon at the forefront of yé-yé fashion (Paris’ answer to Youthquake), designing for brands including Cacharel and Missoni before launching her own label in 1969. (Read a 1964 LIFE magazine article about Khanh here.) Today her company focuses on accessories, particularly eyewear.

Butterick introduced Emmanuelle Khanh sewing patterns in the fall of 1965. This turquoise, suit-effect dress creates interesting effects with topstitching and collar details:

1960s Emmanuelle Khanh suit pattern on the cover of the Butterick Home Catalog, Fall 1965

Emmanuelle Khanh dress on the cover of the Butterick Home Catalog, Fall 1965. Image: myvintagevogue via Freshly Given.

The pattern is Butterick 3718. (Thanks to Jessica Hastings of myvintagevogue for confirming the number.) This photo shows a full-length view of the dress:

An Emmanuelle Khanh dress made from a Butterick sewing pattern in heavy turquoise blue wool jersey. The striped blue, grey and black stockings are by Corah and the suede buttoned gaiters and shoes by Rayne. The white stitched crepe hat is by Simone Mirman.

An Emmanuelle Khanh dress made from a Butterick sewing pattern in heavy turquoise blue wool jersey (1965) Image via Amazon.

It’s interesting to see an established company like Butterick responding to contemporary Sixties youth culture, facilitating access to Youthquake and yé-yé fashion in the process.

Mad Men Era 8: McCall’s New York Designers

April 14, 2014 § 1 Comment

Jane and Roger at the Drapers' party, Mad Men season 5, episode 1-2

Jane and Roger Sterling (Peyton List and John Slattery) in Mad Men, season 5. Image via AMC.

With Mad Men entering its final season, my Mad Men-era series concludes with two posts on fashion designers whose work became available to home sewers in the mid-Sixties. (Browse the series by clicking the Mad Men era tag, or start at the beginning.)

Before the Vogue Americana line there was McCall’s New York Designers’ Collection. In the fall of 1965, McCall’s introduced a new pattern line: New York Designers’ Collection plus 1. (The “plus 1” refers to one foreign designer, Digby Morton; later, as McCall’s added designers to the line, it became “New York Designers’ Collection Plus.”)

The Fall/Winter 1965 issue of McCall’s Pattern Fashions & Home Decorating introduced readers to the new designers. According to the catalogue, the new line featured “the most outstanding fashions of seven leading American designers and one famous London couturier” (click to enlarge):

Meet McCalls New Designers 1965

Meet McCall’s new designers. McCall’s Pattern Fashions & Home Decorating, Fall-Winter 1965–66.

The original list of designers consisted of Larry Aldrich, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass, Laird-Knox, Digby Morton, Originala, Mollie Parnis, and Pauline Trigère, whose agreement with McCall’s dated to the mid-1950s. (Trigère was already featured in an earlier Mad Men era post.) Later additions would include Anne Klein, Jacques Tiffeau, and Rudi Gernreich.

This post looks at three of the best-known American designers in McCall’s new line: Bill Blass, Geoffrey Beene, and Anne Klein.

Bill Blass

Born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bill Blass (1922-2002) showed an early talent for fashion design, studying briefly at Parsons before enlisting in the U.S. military in 1942. After the war he returned to New York to work in the fashion industry; by 1959 he was head designer for Maurice Rentner—then a conservative, established Seventh Avenue label. (McCall’s patterns credit the designer as ‘Bill Blass for Maurice Rentner, Ltd.’) In 1970 he purchased the company and renamed it Bill Blass Ltd. Blass was known for his sophisticated but youthful designs favoured by high society. He retired in 1999.

McCall’s 8927 is an asymmetrical, sleeveless shift dress with applied bands and an inverted pleat on the left-hand side:

1960s Bill Blass dress pattern - McCall's 8927

McCall’s 8927 by Bill Blass (1967) Image via Etsy.

Geoffrey Beene

Born in Louisiana as Samuel Robert Bozeman Jr., Geoffrey Beene (1924-2004) trained at the Traphagen School of Fashion in New York and École de la Chambre Syndicale in Paris, where he also apprenticed with a tailor. Returning to New York, he worked at Harmay and Teal Traina before founding his own company in 1963. Beene was renowned for his innovative, modern designs, as well as his iconoclasm.

Veronica Hamel models McCall’s 1028, a dress cut in seven panels with seven-eighths kimono sleeves and triangular, bias collar:

McCalls 1028 (1968)

McCall’s 1028 by Geoffrey Beene (1968) Image via Etsy.

Anne Klein

Born in Brooklyn as Hannah Golofsky, Anne Klein (1923-1974) also trained at the Traphagen School of Fashion. The pioneer in American sportswear worked in petites and juniors before founding Anne Klein and Company in the late 1960s. Her final collection was completed by Donna Karan, who had begun work at the company in the summer of 1967 as Klein’s intern.

McCall’s 1020 is a sleeveless shift dress with angular armholes and fabulous standing (and convertible) collar. The model is Hellevi Keko:

McCalls 1020 (1967)

McCall’s 1020 by Anne Klein (1967) Image via MOMSPatterns.

All three New York designers would later make the switch to Vogue Patterns: Blass in 1967, Beene and Klein in the 1970s.

Next: Butterick’s Young Designers: Mary Quant, Jean Muir, and Emmanuelle Khanh.

Celia Hammond

March 27, 2014 § 3 Comments

Celia Hammond photographed in Paco Rabanne on the cover of British Vogue, May 1966.

Celia Hammond in Paco Rabanne. British Vogue, May 1966. Photo: David Bailey. Image via Vogue UK.

Born in Indonesia, Celia Hammond was discovered by Norman Parkinson in the early 1960s and went on to build a career as a top model in Paris and Swinging London.

Vogue special beauty issue with cover model Celia Hammond, June 1967

British Vogue, June 1967. Photo: David Bailey. Image via Vogue UK.

Hammond may be seen on many designer patterns from Vogue and Butterick from the mid-1960s, always by British designers.

Here she models an LBD with dropped waist and bow-trimmed overblouse by Michael of London (Michael Donéllan):

1960s Michael of London dress pattern - Vogue 1330

Vogue 1330 by Michael (1964) Image via the Blue Gardenia.

Hammond modelled for patterns by a few British designers licensed to Butterick’s new Young Designers line, including the first Mary Quant patterns. Here she poses in a Quant dress, Butterick 3288, on a Butterick catalogue cover shot by Terence Donovan:

Butterick catalogue cover showing 3288 by Mary Quant - October 1964

Butterick 3288 by Mary Quant; Butterick catalogue, October 1964. Photo: Terence Donovan. Image via eBay.

Jean Muir designed this button-trimmed, mustard-yellow dress for her early label, Jane & Jane:

1960s Jean Muir dress pattern - Butterick 4153

Butterick 4153 by Jean Muir (c. 1965) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Hammond also appears on this popular Jean Muir dress pattern, Butterick 4577:

1960s Jean Muir dress pattern - Butterick 4577

Butterick 4577 by Jean Muir (c. 1967) Image via Etsy.

Here she models a suede-trimmed ensemble by Jo Mattli:

1960s Jo Mattli suit pattern - Vogue 1664

Vogue 1664 by Jo Mattli (1966) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

This evening dress from Belinda Bellville has a shaped bodice and handy pockets:

1960s Belinda Bellville evening dress pattern - Vogue 1680

Vogue 1680 by Belinda Bellville (1966) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

By Ronald Paterson, this three-piece ensemble with cutaway jacket is chic in white matelassé with matching buttons:

1960s Ronald Paterson suit pattern - Vogue 1685

Vogue 1685 by Ronald Paterson (1967) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Richard Dormer photographed Hammond in these two Belinda Bellville designs. Vogue 1795 is an elegant, black-and-white day ensemble, while Vogue 1828 is a short evening dress with tiered, scalloped, bias overskirt:

1960s Belinda Bellville dress and jacket pattern - Vogue 1795

Vogue 1795 by Belinda Bellville (1967) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

1960s Belinda Bellville evening dress pattern - Vogue 1828

Vogue 1828 by Belinda Bellville (1967) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Here Hammond models another dress by Michael Donéllan, its blouson bodice slashed in back to reveal an attached camisole:

1960s Michael dress pattern - Vogue 1861 (1967)

Vogue 1861 by Michael of London (1967) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Hammond retired from modelling to devote herself full-time to her work for animal welfare; she remains active for this cause as the founder of the Celia Hammond Animal Trust.

Click the models tag to see more posts in my models series.

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