Linda Evangelista

July 1, 2014 § Leave a comment

Linda Evangelista photographed by Steven Meisel for the cover of Vogue Italia February 1990

Vogue Italia, February 1990. Photo: Steven Meisel. Image via Bellazon.

In celebration of Canada Day, this models post is devoted to Canadian supermodel Linda Evangelista.

Born in St. Catharines, Ontario to Italian-Canadian parents, Linda Evangelista (b. 1965) was discovered by a scout from Elite at the 1981 Miss Teen Niagara beauty contest. (She didn’t win.) At eighteen she signed with Elite and moved to New York and later, Paris. Evangelista became one of the world’s most successful and influential models, especially after Julien d’Ys cut her hair short in 1988. (More on Voguepedia.)

Linda Evangelista photographed by Patrick Demarchelier for the cover of Harper's Bazaar, March 1997

Harper’s Bazaar, March 1997. Photo: Patrick Demarchelier. Image via Top Models of the World.

Some of Evangelista’s early work can be seen in 1980s Vogue patterns and Burda magazine.

1980s

The young Evangelista made the cover of the Spring/Summer 1985 issue of Burda international:

Linda Evangelista on the cover of Burda international magazine, Frühling-Sommer 1985

Burda international, Spring/Summer 1985. Image via flickr.

She also starred in a jazz club-themed Burda editorial shot by Günter Feuerbacher (click the image for more):

1980s Linda Evangelista editorial in Burda international, Frühling/Sommer 1985

Linda Evangelista in Burda international, Spring/Summer 1985. Photo: Günter Feuerbacher. Image via Magdorable!

Evangelista’s work with Vogue Patterns was for the Paris Originals line. Here she models a popular, pleated wrap dress by Emanuel Ungaro, Vogue 1799:

1980s Emanuel Ungaro dress pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1799

Vogue 1799 by Emanuel Ungaro (1986) Image via the Vintage Patterns Wiki.

Evangelista can be seen on a number of Yves Saint Laurent patterns. Vogue 1720 is an elegant dress with blouson bodice and wide, bias roll collar. The pattern includes the contrast sash:

1980s Yves Saint Laurent dress pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1720

Vogue 1720 by Yves Saint Laurent (1986) Image via Paco Peralta.

Here Evangelista shows off advanced-class colour blocking in Vogue 1721, a Nina Ricci pattern for a dramatic hooded blouse, mock-wrap skirt, sleeveless top, and sash:

1980s Nina Ricci evening pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1721

Vogue 1721 by Nina Ricci (1986) Image via Etsy.

This editorial photo from the Autumn 1986 issue of Vogue Patterns magazine best conveys the different colours:

Linda Evangelista wears Vogue 1721 by Nina Ricci, Vogue Patterns, Autumn 1986. Image via Magdorable!

Evangelista also appeared on the cover of the July/August 1987 issue of Vogue Patterns:

Linda Evangelista on the cover of Vogue Patterns magazine, summer 1987

Vogue Patterns, July/August 1987. Image via tumblr.

1990s

In the mid-1990s, Evangelista’s runway work for Yves Saint Laurent reached home sewers on Vogue pattern envelopes. From the YSL Rive Gauche Spring 1996 collection, Vogue 1862 is a pattern for cropped jacket, blouse, and high-waisted pants (see a detail shot on firstVIEW):

Vogue 1862 by Yves Saint Laurent (1996). Image via Etsy.

Evangelista brings out the drama of this Yves Saint Laurent Cossack-style coat, Vogue 1652:

1990s Yves Saint Laurent coat pattern featuring Linda Evangelista - Vogue 1652

Vogue 1652 by Yves Saint Laurent (1995) Image via Paco Peralta.

Happy Canada Day, everyone!

Patterns in Vogue: Red Hot

May 23, 2014 § 3 Comments

Kate Moss photographed by Juergen Teller in a red Montana trench - Vogue, June 1994

Kate Moss photographed by Juergen Teller, Vogue, June 1994.

It’s Kate Moss Month at SHOWstudio, so I was able to update my “Courrèges Edge” post with a newly released, early fashion film by Nick Knight featuring video of Kate Moss from the 1995 patterns shoot.

An earlier Kate Moss editorial shows the model in sophisticated summer looks, all made up in red using Vogue patterns. Photographed by Juergen Teller, “Red Hot” appears in the June, 1994 issue of Vogue magazine.

Here Moss models a simple, silk charmeuse gown, Vogue 8689; on the right she wears a sheer nylon shirt, Vogue 8447, with a pair of Ray-Ban mirror shades (click to enlarge):

Kate Moss photographed by Juergen Teller - Vogue June 1994

Vogue, June 1994. Photos: Juergen Teller. Fashion editor: Camilla Nickerson.

On the left, Moss’ silk charmeuse romper was made using Vogue 9765, a 1980s bias lingerie pattern; on the right, the jacket from Vogue 1326 by Claude Montana becomes a short, patent leather trench coat:

Kate Moss photographed by Juergen Teller - Vogue June 1994

Vogue, June 1994. Photos: Juergen Teller. Fashion editor: Camilla Nickerson.

Here Moss’ basic silk tank is Vogue 1342; on the right, her silk satin pantsuit is Vogue 1402 by Genny, worn with a black, silk charmeuse cami made with another ’80s lingerie pattern, Vogue 2146:

Kate Moss photographed by Juergen Teller - Vogue, June 1994

Vogue, June 1994. Photos: Juergen Teller. Fashion editor: Camilla Nickerson.

As always, in the back of the magazine readers could find all the details on the patterns used in the shoot:

Patterns used in the Kate Moss / Juergen Teller shoot, Vogue, June 1994

In This Issue, Vogue, June 1994.

Click the Patterns in Vogue tag for more posts in the series.

Patterns in Vogue: Rebecca Lobo

May 21, 2014 § 2 Comments

Vogue Nov1997 Lobo detail

Rebecca Lobo photographed by Michel Comte, Vogue, November 1997.

In 1997, Michel Comte photographed pro basketball player Rebecca Lobo for Vogue magazine in an evening dress made from a Vogue pattern. The American Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) had had its first game earlier that year, and the New York Liberty forward was featured in a health and beauty portfolio, “Women on the Verge,” on six women in the public eye.

Vogue Nov 1997 Rebecca Lobo

Rebecca Lobo, Vogue, November 1997. Photo: Michel Comte.

The caption reads: “Rebecca Lobo, forward for the New York Liberty, former college basketball star, and Olympic gold medalist, is too tall (six feet four) for off-the-rack women’s clothes and too stylish to be relegated to baggy unisex sweatsuits. Her solution: a custom-made wardrobe. Here, satin evening gown from Vogue Pattern #9400.”

Lobo’s bias evening gown is view C of Vogue 9400 from 1995, made up in silk crepe-backed satin:

Vogue 9400 pattern - In This Issue, Vogue, November 1997

Vogue 9400, In This Issue, Vogue, November 1997.

Lobo appeared in the same issue as my previous Patterns in Vogue post—apparently the last issue to feature sewing patterns.

Patterns in Vogue: Clean Cuts

March 17, 2014 § 3 Comments

Mario Testino photo of Guinevere Van Seenus in Vogue, November 1997

Guinevere Van Seenus in Vogue, November 1997. Photo: Mario Testino.

This week, the second post in my occasional series on Vogue’s pattern editorials. (See the first post here.)

“Clean Cuts,” from the November 1997 issue, seems to have been Vogue’s last editorial to feature sewing patterns. Mario Testino photographed Guinevere Van Seenus and Amber Valetta in ’90s minimalist style in the season’s body-conscious basics—“the edgier side of Vogue Patterns,” as the headline says.

Here Guinevere Van Seenus models a white tank top made using Vogue 8062; on the right, her hooded red dress is Butterick 5088, lengthened, made sleeveless, and with an altered neckline:

Guinevere Van Seenus photographed by Mario Testino, 1997

Vogue, November 1997. Photos: Mario Testino. Fashion Editor: Camilla Nickerson.

The hoodie pattern, Butterick 5088, reappears on Amber Valetta, this time as a zip-up top in black Lurex. Her white silk shirt is Vogue 9501, while the red leather pants are Vogue 1982 by DKNY:

Amber Valetta photographed by Mario Testino, Vogue, November 1997

Vogue, November 1997. Photos: Mario Testino. Fashion Editor: Camilla Nickerson.

Here Van Seenus models the Vogue 9501 shirt in silk jersey with the Vogue 1982 DKNY pants in black, while Valetta wears the Vogue 8062 tank with a red leather skirt, Vogue 7074:

Guinevere Van Seenus and Amber Valetta photographed by Mario Testino, Vogue, November 1997

Vogue, November 1997. Photos: Mario Testino. Fashion Editor: Camilla Nickerson.

Butterick 5088 appears once again as a jacket in sequinned jersey with a silver lining (the tank is Butterick 8062); Valetta’s black leather tank dress is Vogue 1725 by Calvin Klein:

Amber Valetta photographed by Mario Testino, Vogue, November 1997

Vogue, November 1997. Photos: Mario Testino. Fashion Editor: Camilla Nickerson.

As always, in the back of the magazine readers could find the details of the patterns used in the shoot:

Vogue November 1997 patterns

In This Issue, Vogue, November 1997.

It’s curious that the text doesn’t mention the designers behind Vogue 1982 and 1725; Donna Karan and Calvin Klein would have been major advertisers. Most interestingly, in showing patterns’ potential through fabric choice and alterations, the editorial reveals Vogue editors thinking like dressmakers.

Vogue 2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy

January 19, 2014 § 10 Comments

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I made the first of my patterns by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy: the cowl-neck sheath dress, Vogue 2248. (See my earlier post here.)

Vogue 2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1999) Dress with contrast cowl neck.

Vogue 2248 by Alexander McQueen for Givenchy (1999)

I had planned to make the dress in my default black, and had even bought some mesh for the contrast cowl neck. But when I started looking back over runway photos from Givenchy’s neo-noir Fall 1998 ready-to-wear collection, I was struck by the palette of neutrals, electric blue, and especially the combination of oxblood with red.

Givenchy FW1998 Frankie Rayder and Sunniva Stordahl

Models: Frankie Rayder and Sunniva Stordahl. Images via firstVIEW via the Fashion Spot.

Givenchy FW1998 by Alexander McQueen - runway photos by Thierry Orban

Photos: Thierry Orban. Images via Corbis.

(There’s a blue version of the original sleeveless dress on eBay. The dress fabric is a nylon/acetate/elastane blend, with acetate lining, and the back zipper reaches all the way up through the cowl.)

I made View B, the sleeveless, mid-calf version, in oxblood with a red cowl neck. I hit Designer Fabrics and found some oxblood wool, red mesh for the contrast cowl, and Bemberg for the lining. The pattern recommends chiffon for the contrast, but I wanted to stick with the mesh used for the runway version. I was a little stumped as to interfacing for the contrast, and even bought some tomato red tricot to use before learning that the best interfacing for mesh is more mesh.

I wanted a close fit, so I ignored the sizing and went by the finished garment measurements printed on the pattern, including 1″ ease at bust and waist and a little more in the hips. I also lengthened the skirt by 1.5″ to achieve the correct length.

Technical drawing for Vogue 2248

Technical drawing for Vogue 2248

This was my first dart-fitted dress, and I had fun sewing my very first contour darts—eventually realizing the virtues of even a makeshift tailor’s ham. The cowl neck is cut on the bias, but this didn’t pose any problems, since the mesh handles much better than chiffon.

With the full lining and absolutely no stretch, the dress feels very old-fashioned to wear. One thing I misjudged was the bodice/cowl part of the bodice—I cut the right size in the bust, but didn’t distribute the extra waist length I was adding between the above-waist and shoulder areas, so it’s a bit on the high side and the cowl neck has a closer fit than in the runway photo. It would have been simpler to cut a size up and take the bodice in at the sides. The “interfaced” mesh is also a little bulky; the extra layer was probably unnecessary.

Since the Fall 1998 collection was inspired by Blade Runner, it seemed appropriate to take photos of the dress at the David Cronenberg: Evolution exhibition at TIFF Bell Lightbox. In the Interzone area, devoted to Naked Lunch (1991), visitors could have their photo taken with a Mugwump:

Evolution

Naomi took some photos of me upstairs at an extension of the Cronenberg show called Body/Mind/Change (BMC). Visitors to the biotech facility BMC Labs can observe the production of personalized POD (Personal On-Demand) implants, which are held awaiting pickup by their hosts. The BMC Labs facility is still open if you’d like to create your own POD implant:

Pod Wants to Know You

Image via BMC Labs.

Here I am in the POD holding area:

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A closer view of the mesh cowl neck:

BMCLabs3

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The cowl fastens in the back with hooks and thread eyes:

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The lab staff let me hold a brand-new red POD (rara avis—most are colourless):

BMCLabs6

We were delighted to find BMC Labs at the end of our visit: it was the perfect backdrop for the dress given McQueen’s futuristic, sci-fi inspiration for his collection for Givenchy. I’m crossing my fingers for a red POD of my own…

Anna Sui: Vogue Patterns, Part 2

January 9, 2014 § 2 Comments

Anna Sui ad May 1999

Anna Sui cosmetics and fragrance campaign, spring 1999.

This week, the second part of my series on Vogue patterns by Anna Sui. (See Part 1 here.)

5. Anna Sui, Spring/Summer 1999 collection

Sui’s Spring 1999 collection was inspired by American sportswear designer Claire McCardell. Nylon dresses invoked McCardell’s functionalism, while denim pieces developed the Americana theme. Further New World references ranged from Mexican clothing, Día de los Muertos handicrafts, and Haitian voodoo, to glam rock and Cecil B. DeMille’s Samson and Delilah (1949). (Browse the full collection at firstVIEW.)

Vogue 2305 is a pattern for two dresses with gathering details. View A is sleeveless, with a raised, drawstring waist and scarf collar; view B has a mock-wrap bodice, off-the-shoulder puffed sleeves, and a midriff cutout above the flared skirt:

1990s Anna Sui dress pattern - Vogue 2305

Vogue 2305 by Anna Sui (1999) Image via eBay.

Kirsten Owen and Giselle Bündchen modelled the dresses on the runway:

AnnaSui SS1999

Models: Kirsten Owen and Giselle Bündchen. Photos via firstVIEW.

6. Anna Sui, Spring/Summer 2001 collection

One of the main inspirations for the Spring 2001 collection was the Mudd Club, a locus for New York’s cultural underground in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An Edo Bertoglio polaroid of Mudd Club co-founder Anya Phillips in her blue, lace-up dress was a reference for some of the pieces. (As well as being an independent fashion designer, Phillips was art director at Fiorucci; see Tim Blanks, “Mudd Quake.”) As Andrew Bolton notes, even the collection’s less overtly ’80s designs reflected Sui’s “Mudd Club thrift-shop punk aesthetic.” (See the full collection at style.com.)

Vogue 2551 is a pattern for two LBDs for stretch knits. The one-shouldered view A is cut on the bias, with the right skirt front extending into a twisted hip drape; view B has pleats at the right shoulder and a left side slit:

Anna Sui jersey dress pattern - Vogue 2551

Vogue 2551 by Anna Sui (2001)

Here are the two dresses on the runway. The one-shouldered jersey dress was modelled by Hannelore Knuts:

Anna Sui SS2001

Models: Hannelore Knuts and Anouck Lepère. Images: Bolton, Anna Sui and style.com.

These two Edo Bertoglio portraits from the Mudd Club era show Anya Phillips, in her blue dress, and Anna Sui (photos via New York Magazine; the Sui portrait was first published in Vogue Italia):

Edo Bertoglio 'skyline' photographs of Anya Phillips and Anna Sui

Anya Phillips, 1979, and Anna Sui, 1981. Photos: Edo Bertoglio. Images via NYMag.com.

(More Mudd Club-era photos may be found in Maripolarama [powerHouse Books, 2005], which contains a recollection by Anna Sui.)

7. Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 2001 collection

Sui’s inspiration for her Fall 2001 collection was another legendary New York venue: the Factory, Andy Warhol’s studio. In reference to Warhol’s Factory parties and ideas about celebrity, the runway presentation incorporated a screening of a black-and-white, short film, commissioned from Zoe Cassavetes, of Sui’s famous friends attending a cocktail party. Other ’60s inspirations included “Baby” Jane Holzer’s eclectic wardrobe, the work of Rudi Gernreich, and William Klein’s film Who Are You, Polly Maggoo? (1966). (Full collection at style.com.)

Vogue 2640 is a pattern for a jacket and dress with contrast binding, plus a matching scarf:

Anna Sui pattern for a striped jacket and dress - Vogue 2640

Vogue 2640 by Anna Sui (2002) Image via Etsy.

Vogue 2640’s striped jacket and dress ensemble was the spring collection’s opening look:

Anna Sui FW 2001

Model: Laura Delicata. Image via firstVIEW.

The collection’s stripes are a reference to a particularly Op-art scene in Klein’s Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?:

Stripe overload scene in Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?

Still from Who Are You, Polly Maggoo? (1966) Image via the Guardian.

8. Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 2003 collection

The concept of art deco skiwear inspired the Fall 2003 collection, which Sui designed during another cold winter (2002-3) when urban skiwear was dominating New York street fashion. In the colours, motifs, and especially the geometric patterns of art deco, as well as the distinctive, tubular 1920s silhouette, the collection chanelled the flapper’s modernity, but with a dose of fun fur. (Full collection on style.com.)

Vogue 7950 or 639 is a pattern for five different faux fur pieces: a jacket, vest, hat, mittens, and legwarmers. The jacket is cropped, with elbow-length sleeves, while the vest has an exposed zipper. The hat has a contrast scarf that could be made to match the mittens’ contrast palms and cuffs, and the legwarmers have elasticized leg bands:

Anna Sui fun fur accessories pattern - Vogue V7950

Vogue 7950 by Anna Sui (2004) Image via Etsy.

Here are some detail shots of the hat and legwarmers on the runway:

Sui FW 2003 details

Model (on left): Missy Rayder. Images via style.com.

L’Officiel’s collection image shows the ’20s ski theme, complete with Anna Sui-branded snowboard (click to enlarge):

Anna Sui FW 2003-4

Anna Sui FW 2003-4. Image via jalougallery.com

Anna Sui’s work wears its postmodernity lightly. The designer’s myriad references, fantastical narratives, and hybrid concepts mean her collections keep evolving while staying true to a bohemian, thrift-store aesthetic. I’m already planning to make several of these (one of the hazards of research). Which are your favourites?

Anna Sui: Vogue Patterns, Part 1

December 21, 2013 § 5 Comments

Linda Evangelista in a mod skirt suit from Anna Sui's FW 1995 collection, photographed by Patrick Demarchelier

Linda Evangelista in Anna Sui, Harper’s Bazaar, August 1995. Photo: Patrick Demarchelier.

Anna Sui (b. 1955) is beloved for her playfully postmodern designs. Sui collections are typically full of eclectic, retro references—fun and accessible, but always with an alternative edge. (For a comprehensive discussion of Sui’s work see Andrew Bolton, Anna Sui [Chronicle Books, 2010].)

Anna Sui’s licensing agreement with Vogue Patterns lasted from the mid-1990s until quite recently. There were also Anna Sui knitting patterns, like this paillette-trimmed mohair sweater shown on the cover of Vogue Knitting magazine:

Red, paillette-trimmed Anna Sui sweater on the cover of Vogue Knitting, Winter 1998-99

Anna Sui sweater on the cover of Vogue Knitting, Winter 1998-99. Image via Vintageknits.net.

This two-part series will present some highlights from Anna Sui’s earlier Vogue patterns, ordered by collection.

1. Anna Sui, Spring/Summer 1995 collection

Anna Sui was introduced to readers of Vogue Patterns in the July/August 1995 issue with a design from her Spring 1995, vintage ’30s and ’40s collection. Inspirations for this collection included pulp magazines, waitress uniforms, and Minnie Mouse. The collection was notable for its use of textiles, which ranged from nylon pinstripes and rubberized chiffon to prints both rockabilly and haute: some of the dresses and skirts used 1940s prints that were designed by Christian Bérard for Ascher Ltd and specially recoloured for the collection.

Vogue 1619 is a pattern for four dresses with vintage details like cut-in shoulders and puffed or tucked sleeves. The red, bouquet print in the large photo is by Christian Bérard. Vogue later proclaimed the “1940s floral look” the look of the season*:

1990s Anna Sui dress pattern - Vogue 1619

Vogue 1619 by Anna Sui (1995) Image via PatternVault on Etsy.

Here’s the Bérard print dress on the runway, complete with red shoes worn with pink socks:

Red print dress by Anna Sui, SS 1995 collection

Image via New York Daily News.

Vogue 1619 made the cover of Vogue Patterns’ September 1995 catalogue:

Anna Sui's Vogue 1619 on the cover of Vogue Patterns catalogue, September 1995

Vogue Patterns catalogue, September 1995. Image via eBay.

Just for fun, here’s a photo of Nicole Kidman in one of the spring collection’s pinstripe suits:

Nicole Kidman in Anna Sui pinstripe suit, sequinned cami, with hat and faux stole, photographed by Steven Meisel Vogue February 1995

Nicole Kidman in Anna Sui, Vogue, February 1995. Photo: Steven Meisel. Fashion editor: Grace Coddington.

2. Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 1995 collection

For Fall 1995 Sui presented a Mod collection. The show opened with Linda Evangelista on the back of a Lambretta scooter and continued with skinny mod suits and pieces in black leather and sequinned camo, referencing Andy Warhol’s camouflage screenprints.

Vogue 1702’s mod suit includes a front-pleated skirt and sleeveless top—best worn with a matching headscarf (as shown with Vogue 1789):

1990s Anna Sui jacket and pleated skirt pattern - Vogue 1702

Vogue 1702 by Anna Sui (1995) Image via Etsy.

Linda Evangelista was photographed in the Vogue 1702 suit by Patrick Demarchelier (see top of post). A tweed version was modelled by Stella Tennant:

Stella Tennant in Anna Sui, with rubber boots and fishing rod, photographed by Arthur Elgort, 1995

Stella Tennant in Anna Sui, Vogue, October 1995. Photo: Arthur Elgort. Fashion editor: Grace Coddington.

3. Anna Sui, Fall/Winter 1997 collection

Sui’s ‘goth’ collection was presented at the Church of Divine Paternity, a neo-Gothic church on New York’s Upper West Side. Siouxie Sioux was a major inspiration for the show, which had post-punk makeup by François Nars and a wealth of textiles characteristic of old-school goth style, such as velvet, lace, lace-printed chiffon, and fishnet. As Bolton notes, the collection referenced the goth love of historicism in Vivienne Westwood-style bustles and ‘mini-crinis.’

Vogue 2072 is a pattern for two mini-crini dresses trimmed with ribbon and lace. It even includes the mesh top and fingerless gloves (see my earlier post here):

1990s Anna Sui dress, top and gloves pattern - Vogue 2072

Vogue 2072 by Anna Sui (1997)

Karen Elson and Tasha Tilberg modelled the Vogue 2072 dresses on the runway, accessorized with matching fingerless gloves, sheer leggings, and beaded devil horns:

Karen Elson and Tasha Tilberg on the runway, Anna Sui FW 1997

Models: Karen Elson, Tasha Tilberg. Images: Bolton, Anna Sui and firstVIEW.

The red, view B version of the Vogue 2072 dress, complete with Sui devil horns, was photographed on a young Sofia Coppola:

Sofia Coppola photographed by Satoshi Saikusa, Spur magazine, October 1997

Sofia Coppola, Spur, October 1997. Photo: Satoshi Saikusa. Image: Bolton, Anna Sui.

4. Anna Sui, Spring/Summer 1998 collection

For spring 1998 Sui presented a surfer-inspired collection. Bold prints, bright colours, and bucket hats conveyed the laid-back spirit of surfer subculture, with Hawaiian, Indian, and Balinese prints and accessories evoking days spent on tropical beaches.

Vogue 2152’s three summery little dresses are like a mini vacation wardrobe:

1990s Anna Sui summer dress pattern - Vogue 2152

Vogue 2152 by Anna Sui (1998) Image via Etsy.

Here are two of the Vogue 2152 dresses on the runway. The slip dress in view B was worn with a long-sleeved mesh top:

Kylie Bax and Christina Kruse on the runway, Anna Sui SS 1998

Models: Kylie Bax and Christina Kruse. Images via firstVIEW.

Kate Moss wears another dress from the collection in this editorial photo by Terry Richardson:

Strapless silk sari dress with gold appliqués, Terry Richardson photo of Kate Moss in Anna Sui, Harper's Bazaar, January 1998

Kate Moss in Anna Sui, Harper’s Bazaar, January 1998. Photo: Terry Richardson. Image via Bolton, Anna Sui.

The gold-appliquéd pink sari silk was inspired by a dress belonging to the Duchess of Windsor, again bringing home the wide-ranging eclecticism of Sui’s references.

Next: Anna Sui’s Vogue patterns into the 2000s.

* Katherine Betts, “The best & worst looks of the ’90s,” Vogue, January 1996, p. 130.

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